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5 myths about the IUD, busted

U.S. women are catching on to the awesomeness of IUDs—but sometimes old myths die hard.

by Maria Isabel Rodriguez, MD

After years in unofficial exile, the IUD is finally making a much-deserved comeback in the U.S. The device got a bad reputation mostly due to health problems women experienced using the creepy-looking Dalkon Shield, a poorly designed model of the IUD that’s been off the market for decades. Fortunately, medical providers and researchers, with the help of the media, are making major progress in spreading the word that new models of the IUD are safe, low-maintenance, super-effective, and can be used by most women.

In spite of all the good news about IUDs, there are still lots of myths and misunderstandings about it rattling around the internet and even among health care providers. Here are 5 of the most common myths I’ve heard—and the reality behind each.

Myth 1: The IUD is dangerous—it can cause infections and infertility.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has conducted study after study with thousands of women around the world, and all the evidence disproves this myth. The data are totally conclusive: overall, women using an IUD have no increased risk of pelvic infection or infertility compared with women who used other types of birth control (with the exception of condoms, which protect from sexually transmitted infections, a.k.a. STIs). If a health care provider tries to tell you that it’s not safe for you to use an IUD, get a second opinion.

On a side note, the WHO studies did discover a factor that is related to infertility: Chlamydia, a common and often silent STI. So get tested before starting a new relationship, and make sure your partner gets tested, too! It’s as simple as peeing in a cup or getting a quick swab. If you’re not in a monogamous relationship—no matter what kind of birth control you use—you should always use a condom to prevent STIs.

Myth 2: The IUD is a big commitment—it’s best for women who are older, married, or already have kids.

One of the best things about the IUD is how long it can last—up to 7 years for the hormonal (Mirena) and 12 years for the copper (ParaGard) IUD.* But there’s no minimum requirement for how long it has to stay in—you can have an IUD removed at any time on request. A simple trip to the clinic, a gentle pull on the strings, and voilà! The IUD is out.

If you have an IUD removed, remember that the contraceptive effect wears off immediately. If you’re sexually active and don’t want to get pregnant, start another method pronto. Depending on what method you switch to, you may even want to start using it before having the IUD removed. Some out-of-date providers won’t insert IUDs for teens or women who haven’t had kids—fortunately, many are catching up with the times. Many of the concerns about IUDs for young women are related to Myth 1. Providers may worry that younger women have higher rates of STIs, which, if untreated, can lead to infertility—but as I noted above, research has shown these fears to be totally baseless when it comes to the IUD models on the U.S. market today.

Myth 3: Getting an IUD is all pain, no gain.

Pain is subjective and IUD insertion pain varies a lot from person to person. It’s hard to know how you will respond ahead of time, but if you’re worried about pain, talk with your provider.

While there are some things that can help make the insertion process more comfortable, unfortunately, there is no magic pill to make it totally painless for all women. Our bodies are wired differently. Some women, especially if they’ve had a baby, find IUD insertion no more uncomfortable than a pap smear. Others, especially if they haven’t been pregnant or have a history of very painful periods, can have very strong cramps during the insertion and the period following it.

  • For a while, some health care providers were giving women a pill called Cytotec or misoprostol before IUD insertion to help with pain. Recent research has confirmed that misoprostol does not help and may actually make you more uncomfortable because of side effects like nausea and low fever.

  • Taking a pain killer like ibuprofen before insertion can help a little bit, but it doesn’t make all sensation go away.

  • Some providers may offer a “cervical block,” which is local anesthesia injected at the cervix. There is mixed evidence on whether this helps… and the injections themselves can be uncomfortable.

Part of what can make an IUD insertion uncomfortable is opening the cervix when it is closed—it can feel a lot like a strong menstrual cramp. (No coincidence, since menstrual cramps are caused partly by the process of the cervix opening.) So here’s one thing that does help: schedule the IUD insertion when your cervix is naturally a little open. This happens twice during each menstrual cycle—during your period and during ovulation.

As for discomfort after insertion, it should be minimal by the time you head home. If you have cramping over the next few days, ibuprofen and a heating pad can make a difference. If you still have pain after a few weeks, check in with your provider.

Myth 4: You need to get a Pap smear before getting an IUD.

Pap smears are unrelated to birth control, including IUDs. If you’re due for a Pap smear, it may be convenient to do it at the same time as an IUD insertion, but if everything looks normal, there’s no need to get the results back first. Even if you’ve had an abnormal Pap result in the past, you can use an IUD.

Myth 5: Your partner will be able to feel the IUD poking him.

Another myth is that male partners will be bothered by your IUD during sex. The IUD is placed inside the uterus, at the very top (called the fundus). Plastic strings are attached to the end, which run through the cervix and outside into the vagina. They should be left long enough to be tucked up behind the cervix, where they should be pretty much out of the way. The average vagina is about 6 inches long, and the cervix is at the very top. The strings are soft enough that they shouldn’t bother you or your partner, and the IUD itself is safely in the uterus, where no partner is ever going to run into it!

If you or your partner are experiencing discomfort when you have sex, go to your healthcare provider to make sure the IUD is placed properly and not partially sticking out of your uterus (a.k.a. expelling). It is also possible that the IUD's thin, flexible strings are in an awkward position and just need to be adjusted.

The IUD is the Mercedes-Benz of modern contraception—its safety, efficacy, and other benefits are amazing. If you’re looking for a highly effective, no muss, no fuss contraceptive, look no further. And if you know someone who still thinks IUDs are old clunkers, send them this article!

This article was last updated on March 21, 2013.

*Editor's note: Since we posted this article, a third IUD option has come onto the U.S. market. Allow us to introduce you to Skyla.

Maria Isabel Rodriguez, MD, is an Obstetrician/Gynecologist and a clinical fellow in Family Planning at the University of California, San Francisco. She likes working with women of all ages and believes that reproductive health is critical to not just the health of women, but making healthy families and happy communities. She surfs badly, but likes it anyways.

Dr. Rodriguez is a faculty member at UCSF. However, the views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the Regents of the University of California, UCSF, UCSF Medical Center, or any entities or units thereof.

I loved mine...until it failed :(

2012-09-14 16:35:25 UTC

Rebekah Havrilla

Even medical professionals sometimes labor under these misapprehensions. Earlier this year I was denied a Mirena IUD by Planned Parenthood because I have lupus and it was therefore "too dangerous" (I do not have clotting issues). I had to appeal to the regional risk management and medical directors to get it. It turns out that the medical tech I'd had appointments with was misinterpreting PP policy based on some of these old myths. Planned Parenthood took it as an opportunity to review this info with their clinical staff and I was able to get my Mirena (which I'd already been using for five years and I LOVE it!).

2012-09-14 17:04:20 UTC

Molly Manglewood

It is awful that happened to you. The chances of that happening are very low with an IUD but like any birth control, there is that risk. The only 100% way to avoid pregnancy is abstinence. The benefits of the IUD though, are that people don't have to think about it or remember it. There is no "Oops, I forgot to take my pill," "I didn't know some medications weakened my birth control pills," or "Oops, the condom broke." Some of the variables are taken out with the IUD which I think makes it a bit more effective. I do hope everything works out for you.

2012-09-15 14:11:56 UTC

Jessica Anderson-Wade

How and when did you find out that yours failed? I'm a little panicked about this happening, and since I've stopped getting my period all together, I'm pretty sure I would never even notice I was pregnant...

2012-09-16 08:55:51 UTC

Emily

Okay this just popped up on my Facebook feed and I clicked on it for some reason. Anyway I felt like I had to reply to "Myth 5" and say that it is not totally a myth. Of course you can't feel the IUD, but my wife had one and I could definitely feel the string and it was not soft. It felt like a stiff piece of fishing wire and was really uncomfortable. She went back and got it shortened a little more which helped. However, later when it was time to take it out it was a more difficult and slightly more painful process than it otherwise should have been. Other than that good job.

2012-09-18 14:22:01 UTC

McKrill

I knew it failed when I got pregnant :( I continued to have my period on mine and when I was week late, I took a pregnancy test just as a joke almost but it came up positive. And honestly, I was already noticing weird body changes like sore breasts and morning sickness type symptoms. Don't freak out; just pay attention to your body. So now I'm back on hormonal BC... which I would have preferred not to do but has been the only consistent BC I've had.

2012-09-19 16:11:52 UTC

Rebekah Havrilla

It was definitely not expected and even the doc said I was just one of those outliers. Until I had to deal with an unexpected pregnancy, it was definitely my BC of choice... long term, low maintenance, and low cost compared to paying for monthly BC. I was asked if I wanted another one but I declined. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice... well then that's definitely my own damn fault.

2012-09-19 16:15:21 UTC

Rebekah Havrilla

i definitely felt the strings, and they were not 'soft'. kinda felt like fishing line. it can be a turnoff for sure and make you adjust your positioning

2012-09-25 19:34:43 UTC

s

Agreed that the strings can still be felt for some people. Mine were distracting but not painful to my boyfriend for a few months, and then they softened. Now he sometimes can feel them in certain positions, or if my cervix is low and the strings are hanging down rather than up. When that happens, I just tuck them up dorsal to my cervix, and everything's fine. Shorter strings can help, but they can also make the strings that much more pokey. (And, as you learned, make removal somewhat trickier.) Other ideas for dealing with the strings besides moving them or your bodies: block them with contraceptive or menstrual sponges, or a condom. I don't know whether the strings actually, physically get softer, or if they just get so covered in mucus that they're less painful. But they do tend to become less prominent with time.

2012-09-25 20:17:46 UTC

SuperDaisy

Insertion is screaming agony. Anyone who tells you otherwise is lying. I would rate it as about the same as breaking a leg, only it is about 15 or 20 minutes of pain. After that, well I am not sure yet, but it seems good so far.

2012-10-01 22:12:27 UTC

noname

I have heard from my doc it either works really well for woman or not well at all. I just had mine out after five years, no issues, no period and no pregnancies. I got another in which wasn't as. Ad as the first time.

2012-10-04 11:03:04 UTC

Rs

My girlfriend of 6 years got the non hormonal IUD. She said it was the most painful thing she ever went through and almost passed out. Her doctor warned her that she had to dilate her to insert the IUD Now that it is in, its great way better than worrying that she remembered to take the pill the same time every night and she lost weight since she got off the pill.

2012-10-04 23:50:20 UTC

Joe

They should actually soften over time, but can be "fishing line"-ish at first.

2012-10-05 05:53:32 UTC

MedStudent

I have had three IUD insertions, 2 three-year ones (a model available in Germany) and 1 ten-year one. I've never been pregnant, and *I'm* not lying when I say it wasn't that bad for me. Uncomfortable, yes, but not bad. As the article states, pain is subjective. There have also been academic studies that have shown a correlation between the amount of pain one is told/led to expect and the amount of pain one reports. To put it another way, you can psych yourself into it being a lot more painful than you otherwise would have interpreted it as being by reading about and reinforcing things in your brain about horrible pain associated with the procedure. Discuss concerns with your doctor or nurse, practice some relaxation techniques, and (pro tip) STOP reading about how awful it is on the internet just before your appointment!

2012-10-19 21:26:26 UTC

Immisceo

I got a non-hormonal copper IUD 2 years ago and have no regrets, but women considering it should be aware of the possible side effects. My period was always super predictable as far as timing. Since getting the IUD it has sometimes been early, sometimes late, and I often have spotting between periods. But despite that, I consider it well worth it.

2012-11-02 16:20:26 UTC

Sotiria

Myth 5 is definitely not a myth. My partners have all felt when we were no longer using condoms. Also, the insertion and removal of the IUD are both quite painful, and with the non-hormonal Paragard both cramps and regular menstrual bleeding can be more intense. IUD's have been known to get suctioned out by DivaCups occasionally, too. Nevertheless, I'm very happy to have non-hormonal birth control I can trust.

2012-11-03 05:02:44 UTC

JobMoney

Funnily enough, I've had the exact opposite happen since getting my copper iud (also two years ago). Whenever I wasn't on hormonal birth control, my period was always super irregular and often just wouldn't come. Ever since I got the iud, my cycle is much more regular and predictable.

2012-11-08 23:39:50 UTC

Mary

Depends on the insertion: I've had three, and the first (with misoprostil, which rejected while I was heaving from the nausea) was fine except for the aching afterwards (and the cramps while it rejected), the second was screaming agony, and the third, a year and a half after that, just got popped in before I'd even realised they'd started the dilating part. There are lots of variables, even in one body.

2012-11-13 19:27:53 UTC

Tamar Rowe

I just got a the ParaGard inserted about 5 hours ago and the process was quite painful but (on the bright side) very, very fast. Since then I have had heavy cramping, which I am hoping will subside by tomorrow. I haven´t had children yet, so naturally this was bound to be somewhat more uncomfortable. The cords are very thin and soft so I presume my partner won´t be complaining about "feeling them" anytime soon, as I could barely feel them myself. It´s painful all in all, but the pain is temporary and more importantly, bearable.

2013-02-20 06:28:21 UTC

maggie

Did you have the ParaGard (non-hormonal) IUD? (That's what I have and love it!) If hormonal birth control just seems to be more effective for you, and your body was good at handling the various aspects of having an IUD, then perhaps consider the Mirena or the new Skyla (http://bedsider.org/features/261) hormonal options (which are both lower doses than oral pills, as the application is localized to the uterus). Be safe and love your body!

2013-03-01 19:44:05 UTC

Kimberley DC Schroder

Did you have the ParaGard (non-hormonal) IUD? (That's what I have and love it!) If hormonal birth control just seems to be more effective for you, and your body was good at handling the various aspects of having an IUD, then perhaps consider the Mirena or the new Skyla (http://bedsider.org/features/261) hormonal options (which are both lower doses than oral pills, as the application is localized to the uterus). Be safe and love your body!

2013-03-01 19:44:05 UTC

Kimberley DC Schroder

LISTEN UP, for everyone who says getting an IUD inserted is ALWAYS painful... mine wasn't! My doctor injected me with a local anesthetic, so I only felt a slight sting for 2 seconds and then just a very uncomfortable feeling, but so WORTH it. Ask your doctor if that is an option, and take like, 4/5 Advil beforehand. I was 15 when I got mine in and I was able to get through it, so I'm sure (mostly) everyone to get an IUD will be older than me, and if I could do it, so can you. Just suck it up buttercup, cause you wanna know what hurts? Pregnancy

2013-03-17 00:24:43 UTC

bailey

LISTEN UP, for everyone who says getting an IUD inserted is ALWAYS painful... mine wasn't! My doctor injected me with a local anesthetic, so I only felt a slight sting for 2 seconds and then just a very uncomfortable feeling, but so WORTH it. Ask your doctor if that is an option, and take like, 4/5 Advil beforehand. I was 15 when I got mine in and I was able to get through it, so I'm sure (mostly) everyone to get an IUD will be older than me, and if I could do it, so can you. Just suck it up buttercup, cause you wanna know what hurts? Pregnancy

2013-03-17 00:24:43 UTC

bailey

I have had 3. All felt like a bad cramp or two. Not screaming agony. As the article says, pain is subjective and we all experience it differently

2013-04-14 18:45:21 UTC

Kit McGee

I had the insertion procedure yesterday. I admittedly spent a lot of time on google reading a lot of (mostly negative) stories so I was quite nervous about the pain. I took 3 motrin beforehand and had no anesthetic or drugs at the doctor. The process was fairly easy and no more uncomfortable than my yearly gyno checkup. I had one strong cramp that hurt for about 3 seconds (she prepared me for this before it happened), that was the extent of the pain. After that it just felt like an uncomfortable pressure (much like a pap smear). Overall it took about 10 minutes and I was done. Afterward I had light spotting and very mild cramps—felt much like a normal period—no dizziness or serious pain. In retrospect, I wish I had skipped the googling and saved myself from getting worked up. Everything was completely routine for me and the pain of the cramp was quick/minimal.

2013-04-30 13:37:33 UTC

disqus_V9FABgktBK

I just had my iud put in yesterday and feel completely fine!! So far no cramps or nothing, And for the hurting part it barely hurt all I felt was a couple pokes, then again after giving birth nothing compares or hurts worse :)

2013-04-30 16:26:02 UTC

Mary Montalvo

I had the insertion procedure yesterday. I admittedly spent a lot of time on google reading a lot of (mostly negative) stories so I was quite nervous about the pain. I took 3 motrin beforehand and had no anesthetic or drugs at the doctor. The process was fairly easy and no more uncomfortable than my yearly gyno checkup. I had one strong cramp that hurt for about 3 seconds (she prepared me for this before it happened), that was the extent of the pain. After that it just felt like an uncomfortable pressure (much like a pap smear). Overall it took about 10 minutes and I was done. Afterward I had light spotting and very mild cramps—felt much like a normal period—no dizziness or serious pain. In retrospect, I wish I had skipped the googling and saved myself from getting worked up. Everything was completely routine for me and the pain of the cramp was quick/minimal.

2013-04-30 13:37:33 UTC

disqus_V9FABgktBK

I just had my iud put in yesterday and feel completely fine!! So far no cramps or nothing, And for the hurting part it barely hurt all I felt was a couple pokes, then again after giving birth nothing compares or hurts worse :)

2013-04-30 16:26:02 UTC

Mary Montalvo

I had a terrible copper coil insertion experience - although relatively fast, it was extremely painful and I passed out and convulsed, supposedly very rare. I couldn't stand up to make my way out of the clinic for hours, because every time I sat upright, I passed out again. The cramps were awful, but mefenamic acid definitely helps with the cramping, apart from the INSANE and intense burning that I get all over my stomach within about half an hour of taking it. Cramping eased eventually, and I managed to squeeze some sex in, which was great, but short-lived. My first period lasted for what seemed like forever, (12 days) although I was prepared for this. Only the cramping of the period later meant that I partially expelled the coil and could feel the plastic device hanging out of my uterus with my fingers. Something felt 'not quite right' but I had to leave it like this for seven days, because the gyno didn't want to remove it in case I fell pregnant (had sex around the time I discovered it, and sperm cells live on for a short while). I didn't want to go through the painful experience again of insertion, so I asked to have it replaced under general anaesthetic (they replace the coil in the same procedure for you). I thought that my vaso-vagal reflex (the dive in blood pressure, the fainting and convulsing) was possibly partly psychosomatic, so I wanted to keep myself from being cognitively aware of the procedure. But the nurse convinced me to go for local anaesthetic, and booked my next appointment for me, which I thought would mean that I would be awake, but I wouldn't feel anything. I reconfirmed that I wanted local anaesthetic, because I was so scared of the pain and the response, and she told me she would use an anaesthetic gel, which is what I had during the first procedure with the other doctor. It didn't help me last time, and later, a nurse explained to me that doctors believe it has anaesthetic qualities, but are actually not sure. I restated this, and said to them I really want the anaesthetic. She agreed, and said she would use both. She began the examination, and told me I would feel pain. It was more excruciating then the last time. She told me the old one was removed. Then she said I would feel more pain. It was absolutely awful. I screamed and cried, and her assist kept repeating "you're doing really well". I couldn't take it. I felt my BP drop, but I didn't think I would faint, as I was so mindful of it. She warned me of more pain, and by now, I was asking whether it was the application of the local anaesthetic that hurt. After a few seconds of more tinkering, she said she was done. She asked me if I needed water, because I was crying, with my hands over my eyes and not able to speak. The assist asked me if it still hurt, (YES) and told me it was because my womb is cramping to try and reject the foreign object. Well, cramping I can handle, but the pinching and tugging is what was unbearable, and I still felt that. I can take a massive punch in the arm far better than I can take a bad pinch in the arm, so when it's going on inside you with no way of controlling the feeling, I panic. I was then told AFTER that the reason I didn't get the local anaesthetic was because the needle hurts more than the coil insertion. If that was the case, I clearly would have stuck to my guns and opted for general anaesthetic. I left without speaking. They didn't take into account the psychological damage it caused me - I felt violated because I had said no to doing the procedure without pain relief, and they went ahead with it anyway, and was screaming and in pain the whole time. I cried for hours after, (I am dealing with some issues with depression, so the emotional experience for me is amplified), and am at home trying to recover somewhat. I know that every single woman has a different experience, my flatmate seemed fine, she was just a little crampy. I'm just really pissed, because I read up on everything online, and whilst the internet is not balanced and people with bad experiences are more likely to write than people with good experiences, I was soothed by how rare certain things are said to be; the fainting and nausea, the expulsion etc. I wondered about ectopic pregnancy, and guess what I was told? It's RARE! So I feel like no matter what, there is a fear factor attached to this for me. Sorry.

2013-05-08 00:16:41 UTC

disqus_gfBVjFkeXi

I had my third IUD put in today. The first time was a breeze, the second time I passed out but I hadn't really eaten and I was 110 degrees outside. Today's was uncomfortable and my blood pressure dropped, I yelled "oh fucking fuck." My rock star doc told me to use all the fucks I want because it was merited. After the insertion I was hot,pale, short of breath and faint. Have no fear, they promptly handed me apple juice, put a cold compress on my forehead and rocked my legs/knees side to side and it helped the residual pain. It hurt and I left light headed and super cramps but it was worth it. Also, the FDA hasn't approved the minera for 7 years yet. Other country's claim the 7 year use but I want approval before I risk two extra years.

2013-05-14 08:54:55 UTC

Nh

I had my third IUD put in today. The first time was a breeze, the second time I passed out but I hadn't really eaten and I was 110 degrees outside. Today's was uncomfortable and my blood pressure dropped, I yelled "oh fucking fuck." My rock star doc told me to use all the fucks I want because it was merited. After the insertion I was hot,pale, short of breath and faint. Have no fear, they promptly handed me apple juice, put a cold compress on my forehead and rocked my legs/knees side to side and it helped the residual pain. It hurt and I left light headed and super cramps but it was worth it. Also, the FDA hasn't approved the minera for 7 years yet. Other country's claim the 7 year use but I want approval before I risk two extra years.

2013-05-14 08:54:55 UTC

Nh

I disagree with the notion of pain being what you expect it to be. I went in to have the IUD inserted under the impression that it would be no more than mildly uncomfortable, however I found it very painful. Some women do physically and chemically feel more pain when getting this procedure carried out, it is all dependent upon how tight your own OS is, and also how your brain and body react to it.

2013-06-16 13:38:34 UTC

Rachel shcmittendorf

My IUD insertion was pretty painful, but that is because I have never had "trauma" to my uterus before.....I.E. I've never had children. But my friends who have it have said there is very little to no pain when it is inserted.

2013-07-08 18:07:49 UTC

Katherine Spencer

Great question, Brooke. Each IUD has a different impact on women's periods. The IUDs with hormones (Mirena and Skyla) can cause more frequent spotting for the first 6 months, but after a year up to one in three women no longer have a period at all. Nearly all women using the IUDs with hormones have less bleeding overall, and many have less pain during their periods. The IUD without hormones (ParaGard) may cause heavier bleeding or cramping in the first 6 months.

2013-07-25 20:38:16 UTC

Maria Isabel Rodriguez

The IUDs with low-dose hormones (Mirena and Skyla) keep the endometrium from growing while they're inside the uterus—that's why women who have them have lighter periods or no periods. The nonhormonal IUD (ParaGard) doesn't change the endometrial growth or shedding (menstruation). IUDs don't affect the endometrium after they are removed.

2013-07-25 20:40:53 UTC

Maria Isabel Rodriguez

Great question, Brooke. Each IUD has a different impact on women's periods. The IUDs with hormones (Mirena and Skyla) can cause more frequent spotting for the first 6 months, but after a year up to one in three women no longer have a period at all. Nearly all women using the IUDs with hormones have less bleeding overall, and many have less pain during their periods. The IUD without hormones (ParaGard) may cause heavier bleeding or cramping in the first 6 months.

2013-07-25 20:38:16 UTC

Maria Isabel Rodriguez

The IUDs with low-dose hormones (Mirena and Skyla) keep the endometrium from growing while they're inside the uterus—that's why women who have them have lighter periods or no periods. The nonhormonal IUD (ParaGard) doesn't change the endometrial growth or shedding (menstruation). IUDs don't affect the endometrium after they are removed.

2013-07-25 20:40:53 UTC

Maria Isabel Rodriguez

They don't I had it for 2 1/2 years and my husband could always feel it.

2013-08-07 19:38:14 UTC

Jackie

They don't I had it for 2 1/2 years and my husband could always feel it.

2013-08-07 19:38:14 UTC

Jackie

Well, I got Mirena the first time 5 years ago. I have never given birth and it was agony (I literally cried and screamed, and probably sounded like someone in labor). With that said, I'll be soon setting up the appointment for my replacement. Even knowing how intense the pain was, the five years I had of no periods and no pain (I have endometriosis) and the happy side effect of a better mood... you bet I'll be getting it again.

2013-08-10 18:11:56 UTC

Aldona

Well, I got Mirena the first time 5 years ago. I have never given birth and it was agony (I literally cried and screamed, and probably sounded like someone in labor). With that said, I'll be soon setting up the appointment for my replacement. Even knowing how intense the pain was, the five years I had of no periods and no pain (I have endometriosis) and the happy side effect of a better mood... you bet I'll be getting it again.

2013-08-10 18:11:56 UTC

Aldona

I have had my Mirena for 5 years and almost 6 months...should I be concerned that It has been more than the recommended 5 years? I am planning on making an appointment to get it removed soon..I have just been procrastinating. Looking for advise..thanks a bunch!

2013-08-19 03:55:32 UTC

Jenn

My wife had one put in over a year ago and it hasn't worked out. She's had a constant discharge which she says makes her feel gross. She's had awful cramps for the first week or two, and still has occasional cramps which she attributes to the IUD. The "myth" that he'll feel the thing poking him is NOT a myth. I feel it every time, and it kind of hurts - feels like I'm poking the end of a ball point pen or something, I suppose a year (and then some) is an adequate trial run. We're having it removed.

2013-08-21 11:54:20 UTC

Christopher

My wife had one put in over a year ago and it hasn't worked out. She's had a constant discharge which she says makes her feel gross. She's had awful cramps for the first week or two, and still has occasional cramps which she attributes to the IUD. The "myth" that he'll feel the thing poking him is NOT a myth. I feel it every time, and it kind of hurts - feels like I'm poking the end of a ball point pen or something, I suppose a year (and then some) is an adequate trial run. We're having it removed.

2013-08-21 11:54:20 UTC

Christopher

I got my Skyla IUD put in around March 2013. My NP gave me something to help relax my cervix to take the night before (I can't remember what it's called, but it's used usually to help induce contractions during pregnancy), which really helped. She also told me to take 4 ibuprofen an hour or two before insertion. I was told by friends and even my sister, all who have had children and had the IUD inserted, that the IUD insertion feels relative to the pain you feel when you are about 6cm dilated and that they all went home and had to fall asleep to bear with the pain. I brought my boyfriend along (poor thing) for support and in case I needed someone to drive me home, but it really was NOT that bad. It felt like my worst period cramps just amped up a little bit. I didn't feel like passing out and I did not feel like anything horrible had just happened. I continued my day and even ran some errands. The one thing, though, that happened that I wasn't expecting was the appearance of cysts on my ovaries for the first two months. They were painful, but it is not typical for every experience. It was just my body's way of dealing with all of the hormones down there. From then on out I absolutely loved my IUD. I still do! I have a very light period now that lasts about 4 days when I used to have a heavy one for 5 or 6. It's also low maintenance, my boyfriend has never felt it and mine only lasts for THREE years and is a tinier version of the Mirena and is intended for women who have not have children yet (that's me!). There are a couple things that are making me want mine out NOW, though.. I have completely lost my libido. I have no idea where it went and I've been playing hide-and-seek with it for months. I lost it about a month after I got the IUD. I also am horribly moody. I'm usually patient, kind and happy-go-lucky and I am completely a different person now. I have no patience, I am usually snippy (my poor boyfriend) and I can not find my fun, sassy personality for the life of me. If I do get out of my rut, it's usually just for a couple days and I'm back to being my monstrosity of a self. It's really irritating. This is, however, how my body reacted when I was on the pill. I'm not sure if it's just a case-by-case scenario with how my body reacts to the hormones or if this is happening with everyone, but I don't want to find out. As much as I love my low-maintenance IUD, I will probably be getting it removed on my day off next week. :/ It's bittersweet for me, but I would rather save my relationship than have to deal with how I've been feeling lately. If anyone has any questions about my experience, please don't hesitate to email me with questions. SRSchraml@gmail.com

2013-08-22 15:57:16 UTC

Stephanie Schraml

My wife had one put in over a year ago and it hasn't worked out. She's had a constant discharge which she says makes her feel gross. She's had awful cramps for the first week or two, and still has occasional cramps which she attributes to the IUD. The "myth" that he'll feel the thing poking him is NOT a myth. I feel it every time, and it kind of hurts - feels like I'm poking the end of a ball point pen or something, I suppose a year (and then some) is an adequate trial run. We're having it removed.

2013-08-21 11:54:20 UTC

Christopher

I got my Skyla IUD put in around March 2013. My NP gave me something to help relax my cervix to take the night before (I can't remember what it's called, but it's used usually to help induce contractions during pregnancy), which really helped. She also told me to take 4 ibuprofen an hour or two before insertion. I was told by friends and even my sister, all who have had children and had the IUD inserted, that the IUD insertion feels relative to the pain you feel when you are about 6cm dilated and that they all went home and had to fall asleep to bear with the pain. I brought my boyfriend along (poor thing) for support and in case I needed someone to drive me home, but it really was NOT that bad. It felt like my worst period cramps just amped up a little bit. I didn't feel like passing out and I did not feel like anything horrible had just happened. I continued my day and even ran some errands. The one thing, though, that happened that I wasn't expecting was the appearance of cysts on my ovaries for the first two months. They were painful, but it is not typical for every experience. It was just my body's way of dealing with all of the hormones down there. From then on out I absolutely loved my IUD. I still do! I have a very light period now that lasts about 4 days when I used to have a heavy one for 5 or 6. It's also low maintenance, my boyfriend has never felt it and mine only lasts for THREE years and is a tinier version of the Mirena and is intended for women who have not have children yet (that's me!). There are a couple things that are making me want mine out NOW, though.. I have completely lost my libido. I have no idea where it went and I've been playing hide-and-seek with it for months. I lost it about a month after I got the IUD. I also am horribly moody. I'm usually patient, kind and happy-go-lucky and I am completely a different person now. I have no patience, I am usually snippy (my poor boyfriend) and I can not find my fun, sassy personality for the life of me. If I do get out of my rut, it's usually just for a couple days and I'm back to being my monstrosity of a self. It's really irritating. This is, however, how my body reacted when I was on the pill. I'm not sure if it's just a case-by-case scenario with how my body reacts to the hormones or if this is happening with everyone, but I don't want to find out. As much as I love my low-maintenance IUD, I will probably be getting it removed on my day off next week. :/ It's bittersweet for me, but I would rather save my relationship than have to deal with how I've been feeling lately. If anyone has any questions about my experience, please don't hesitate to email me with questions. SRSchraml@gmail.com

2013-08-22 15:57:16 UTC

Stephanie Schraml

My wife had one put in over a year ago and it hasn't worked out. She's had a constant discharge which she says makes her feel gross. She's had awful cramps for the first week or two, and still has occasional cramps which she attributes to the IUD. The "myth" that he'll feel the thing poking him is NOT a myth. I feel it every time, and it kind of hurts - feels like I'm poking the end of a ball point pen or something, I suppose a year (and then some) is an adequate trial run. We're having it removed.

2013-08-21 11:54:20 UTC

Christopher

I got my Skyla IUD put in around March 2013. My NP gave me something to help relax my cervix to take the night before (I can't remember what it's called, but it's used usually to help induce contractions during pregnancy), which really helped. She also told me to take 4 ibuprofen an hour or two before insertion. I was told by friends and even my sister, all who have had children and had the IUD inserted, that the IUD insertion feels relative to the pain you feel when you are about 6cm dilated and that they all went home and had to fall asleep to bear with the pain. I brought my boyfriend along (poor thing) for support and in case I needed someone to drive me home, but it really was NOT that bad. It felt like my worst period cramps just amped up a little bit. I didn't feel like passing out and I did not feel like anything horrible had just happened. I continued my day and even ran some errands. The one thing, though, that happened that I wasn't expecting was the appearance of cysts on my ovaries for the first two months. They were painful, but it is not typical for every experience. It was just my body's way of dealing with all of the hormones down there. From then on out I absolutely loved my IUD. I still do! I have a very light period now that lasts about 4 days when I used to have a heavy one for 5 or 6. It's also low maintenance, my boyfriend has never felt it and mine only lasts for THREE years and is a tinier version of the Mirena and is intended for women who have not have children yet (that's me!). There are a couple things that are making me want mine out NOW, though.. I have completely lost my libido. I have no idea where it went and I've been playing hide-and-seek with it for months. I lost it about a month after I got the IUD. I also am horribly moody. I'm usually patient, kind and happy-go-lucky and I am completely a different person now. I have no patience, I am usually snippy (my poor boyfriend) and I can not find my fun, sassy personality for the life of me. If I do get out of my rut, it's usually just for a couple days and I'm back to being my monstrosity of a self. It's really irritating. This is, however, how my body reacted when I was on the pill. I'm not sure if it's just a case-by-case scenario with how my body reacts to the hormones or if this is happening with everyone, but I don't want to find out. As much as I love my low-maintenance IUD, I will probably be getting it removed on my day off next week. :/ It's bittersweet for me, but I would rather save my relationship than have to deal with how I've been feeling lately. If anyone has any questions about my experience, please don't hesitate to email me with questions. SRSchraml@gmail.com

2013-08-22 15:57:16 UTC

Stephanie Schraml

I got my Skyla IUD put in around March 2013. My NP gave me something to help relax my cervix to take the night before (I can't remember what it's called, but it's used usually to help induce contractions during pregnancy), which really helped. She also told me to take 4 ibuprofen an hour or two before insertion. I was told by friends and even my sister, all who have had children and had the IUD inserted, that the IUD insertion feels relative to the pain you feel when you are about 6cm dilated and that they all went home and had to fall asleep to bear with the pain. I brought my boyfriend along (poor thing) for support and in case I needed someone to drive me home, but it really was NOT that bad. It felt like my worst period cramps just amped up a little bit. I didn't feel like passing out and I did not feel like anything horrible had just happened. I continued my day and even ran some errands. The one thing, though, that happened that I wasn't expecting was the appearance of cysts on my ovaries for the first two months. They were painful, but it is not typical for every experience. It was just my body's way of dealing with all of the hormones down there. From then on out I absolutely loved my IUD. I still do! I have a very light period now that lasts about 4 days when I used to have a heavy one for 5 or 6. It's also low maintenance, my boyfriend has never felt it and mine only lasts for THREE years and is a tinier version of the Mirena and is intended for women who have not have children yet (that's me!). There are a couple things that are making me want mine out NOW, though.. I have completely lost my libido. I have no idea where it went and I've been playing hide-and-seek with it for months. I lost it about a month after I got the IUD. I also am horribly moody. I'm usually patient, kind and happy-go-lucky and I am completely a different person now. I have no patience, I am usually snippy (my poor boyfriend) and I can not find my fun, sassy personality for the life of me. If I do get out of my rut, it's usually just for a couple days and I'm back to being my monstrosity of a self. It's really irritating. This is, however, how my body reacted when I was on the pill. I'm not sure if it's just a case-by-case scenario with how my body reacts to the hormones or if this is happening with everyone, but I don't want to find out. As much as I love my low-maintenance IUD, I will probably be getting it removed on my day off next week. :/ It's bittersweet for me, but I would rather save my relationship than have to deal with how I've been feeling lately. If anyone has any questions about my experience, please don't hesitate to email me with questions. SRSchraml@gmail.com

2013-08-22 15:57:16 UTC

Stephanie Schraml

I had my Mirena inserted on August 30th 2013. Basically, I chose the IUD because I was looking for long-term BC that had the benefits of cutting down on my heavy periods. I'm in my mid-twenties and have never had children. Insertion was one of the most memorable days of my life --It was PAINFUL! And today, almost 5 days after I'm still in pain. I've stopped taking the Motrin because I don't enjoy popping drugs into my system but I just don't understand why I'm still having this pain. My mom and boyfriend are worried. Please do you know why I keep having this recurrent pain in my lower left side? It lasts about seven seconds each time and feels like something is about to burst. Help pls..

2013-09-03 16:56:15 UTC

nina

I had a failed first attempt at insertion. Two doctors tried and due to the angle of the cervix they re-scheduled me for a second appointment using an ultrasound. It was still ridiculously painful, had another failed attempt. A cervical block was used the 3rd time and it was very easy, hardly felt a thing. I think they were good doctors, they said I just had a difficult cervix. For Americans: I got stuck with a huge bill although my insurance claimed they would cover it. They denied charges for the pre-op pregnancy test, the ultrasound, the related reading, the cervical block. Still waiting to see if they cover any of it. So far I'm still glad I had it done. The period right after was abnormally painful, but seems to be getter better over time.

2013-09-04 08:33:26 UTC

Adrienne Miller

I had a failed first attempt at insertion. Two doctors tried and due to the angle of the cervix they re-scheduled me for a second appointment using an ultrasound. It was still ridiculously painful, had another failed attempt. A cervical block was used the 3rd time and it was very easy, hardly felt a thing. I think they were good doctors, they said I just had a difficult cervix. For Americans: I got stuck with a huge bill although my insurance claimed they would cover it. They denied charges for the pre-op pregnancy test, the ultrasound, the related reading, the cervical block. Still waiting to see if they cover any of it. So far I'm still glad I had it done. The period right after was abnormally painful, but seems to be getter better over time.

2013-09-04 08:33:26 UTC

Adrienne Miller

I'm scheduled for a Paraguard 4 days from now at Planned Parenthood. I have moderate to severe anxiety when it comes to anticipating pain, so I'm hoping there will be someone to distract me during insertion, or Xanax. I'm in my teens and have never given birth. Hormonal birth control is not an option for me and condoms are quite stressful, because although my partner and I use them correctly, I have had them break, and thankfully, I got my hands on the morning after pill in time to prevent an unwanted pregnancy. I was instructed to take 800mg of Tylenol before the procedure and told my cervix would be numbed. I should be menstruating by my appointment time. I'll report back with my experience when (if nothing goes wrong) I've gotten it inserted!

2013-09-05 21:22:24 UTC

temporelle

I'm scheduled for a Paraguard 4 days from now at Planned Parenthood. I have moderate to severe anxiety when it comes to anticipating pain, so I'm hoping there will be someone to distract me during insertion, or Xanax. I'm in my teens and have never given birth. Hormonal birth control is not an option for me and condoms are quite stressful, because although my partner and I use them correctly, I have had them break, and thankfully, I got my hands on the morning after pill in time to prevent an unwanted pregnancy. I was instructed to take 800mg of Tylenol before the procedure and told my cervix would be numbed. I should be menstruating by my appointment time. I'll report back with my experience when (if nothing goes wrong) I've gotten it inserted!

2013-09-05 21:22:24 UTC

temporelle

The nurse who checked my blood with a finger-prick was a jerk. I had to request a different nurse to hold my hand during the procedure; she was awesome. In went the speculum, then my cervix was numbed with a gel, then the doctor prepared me for the sounding, which felt like a really bad cramp. I yelled a lot of incoherent things. Then she told me to take deep breaths while she inserted the IUD. It felt like the worst cramp I have ever experienced, and for about 5 minutes afterwards, everything felt sort of okay. The doctor told me that what I had felt was similar to labor pains. But while I was resting on the table, I started to get very sweaty and panicky, so I dressed myself and went to the restroom - vomiting ensued from ~3:30pm to ~6pm at various locations - side of the road, grocery store restroom, side of the car, etc. (I even threw up in my hair.) I wasn't given a pad or post-insertion consultation because I was so sick, and I bled through my (thankfully dark wash) jeans. I fell asleep in the car and when I got home, I went straight to bed and after about half an hour, started to feel better, and ate some crackers and grapes. I started having really bad cramps again a few hours after that, so I took one extra strength Tylenol and fell asleep. And now I feel okay, aside from some very mild cramps every now and then. Hopefully this helps anyone who wants to know what insertion is like.

2013-09-10 23:05:09 UTC

temporelle

Just got my 2nd ParaGard. First one was in for 11 years and I loved it! My uterus curves, as we found out, so the first attempt with the new IUD didn't work. The nurse practitioner tried for 3-4 times to insert the measuring device, but could not get it to go very far and decided not to do the insertion. She gave me a prescription for Misoprostol used as a vaginal insert and had me come back the next day to try again when the doctor was in the office as well. I was a little wary about misoprostol after reading the information about it, but figured it was worth a shot. The night before my appointment I inserted 4 pills vaginally, trying to get them near my cervix. The misoprostol definitely made me crampy - like a bad day during my period, but it was totally worth it if it helped with the insertion. The next day I went for the 2nd try and everything went perfectly. The nurse practitioner was able to use the measuring tool. She had to bend it though to get it to go in. My uterus is definitely not straight. She inserted the IUD (which isn't that bad, just a couple minutes of crampy discomfort) and I was good to go. After the insertion I was a little crampy, but again nothing too bad. The actual insertion experience is not as bad as the horror stories you read on the internet. The short time of pain is worth not having to worry about birth control for 10 more years. Not sure if the misoprostol helped, or just having a day between the removal and re-insertion made a difference, but I would use it again if I had to.

2013-09-11 19:00:24 UTC

Sarah

Just got my 2nd ParaGard. First one was in for 11 years and I loved it! My uterus curves, as we found out, so the first attempt with the new IUD didn't work. The nurse practitioner tried for 3-4 times to insert the measuring device, but could not get it to go very far and decided not to do the insertion. She gave me a prescription for Misoprostol used as a vaginal insert and had me come back the next day to try again when the doctor was in the office as well. I was a little wary about misoprostol after reading the information about it, but figured it was worth a shot. The night before my appointment I inserted 4 pills vaginally, trying to get them near my cervix. The misoprostol definitely made me crampy - like a bad day during my period, but it was totally worth it if it helped with the insertion. The next day I went for the 2nd try and everything went perfectly. The nurse practitioner was able to use the measuring tool. She had to bend it though to get it to go in. My uterus is definitely not straight. She inserted the IUD (which isn't that bad, just a couple minutes of crampy discomfort) and I was good to go. After the insertion I was a little crampy, but again nothing too bad. The actual insertion experience is not as bad as the horror stories you read on the internet. The short time of pain is worth not having to worry about birth control for 10 more years. Not sure if the misoprostol helped, or just having a day between the removal and re-insertion made a difference, but I would use it again if I had to.

2013-09-11 19:00:24 UTC

Sarah

Just got my 2nd ParaGard. First one was in for 11 years and I loved it! My uterus curves, as we found out, so the first attempt with the new IUD didn't work. The nurse practitioner tried for 3-4 times to insert the measuring device, but could not get it to go very far and decided not to do the insertion. She gave me a prescription for Misoprostol used as a vaginal insert and had me come back the next day to try again when the doctor was in the office as well. I was a little wary about misoprostol after reading the information about it, but figured it was worth a shot. The night before my appointment I inserted 4 pills vaginally, trying to get them near my cervix. The misoprostol definitely made me crampy - like a bad day during my period, but it was totally worth it if it helped with the insertion. The next day I went for the 2nd try and everything went perfectly. The nurse practitioner was able to use the measuring tool. She had to bend it though to get it to go in. My uterus is definitely not straight. She inserted the IUD (which isn't that bad, just a couple minutes of crampy discomfort) and I was good to go. After the insertion I was a little crampy, but again nothing too bad. The actual insertion experience is not as bad as the horror stories you read on the internet. The short time of pain is worth not having to worry about birth control for 10 more years. Not sure if the misoprostol helped, or just having a day between the removal and re-insertion made a difference, but I would use it again if I had to.

2013-09-11 19:00:24 UTC

Sarah

Has anyone had problems with severe cramping for weeks after insertion? i'm coming up on one month & i'm still having terrible pains. they feel very similar to insertion & i catch myself wanting to keel over. this is my first mirena & i have not had children. not sure if my uterus just has to get used to things or if this is a real problem? all the info i've found relates to insertion, but what about the first few months?

2013-09-16 04:41:50 UTC

coco watson

Thanks for your note, Jenn. The Mirena is guaranteed to work for up to 5 years. It's okay that you're a few months past that line, but don't count on the Mirena continuing to work as birth control indefinitely. Make your appointment soon—and consider using a back up method in the meantime.

2013-09-19 17:27:49 UTC

Maria Isabel Rodriguez

Hi Carol, Thanks for your note. Pap tests aren't about STI screening; a pap test can identify abnormal cells on the cervix. So Pap smears are not related to using IUDs—or to any other type of birth control! You are right that it's a good idea to get tested for STIs. But STI testing is important for women who have risk factors for STIs—not women who want to use any particular form of birth control. STI risk factors differ by age, sexual partners, and even where you live. For some folks, regular STI tests are the norm. For example, the US Centers for Disease Control recommends that all women under age 26 get screened for Chlamydia and gonorrhea once a year. That's because these two STIs can be stealthy (i.e. no symptoms) and can cause pelvic inflammatory disease. For someone who wants to use an IUD, whether or not to test for STIs depends on when they were last tested and whether they have any risk factors for STIs. It's definitely a good topic to discuss with a healthcare provider. Medical research shows that an STI test can safely be done on the same day as the IUD insertion (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23168755) with any needed treatment given when the test results are in.

2013-09-19 17:34:13 UTC

Maria Isabel Rodriguez

Thanks for your note, Jenn. The Mirena is guaranteed to work for up to 5 years. It's okay that you're a few months past that line, but don't count on the Mirena continuing to work as birth control indefinitely. Make your appointment soon—and consider using a back up method in the meantime.

2013-09-19 17:27:49 UTC

Maria Isabel Rodriguez

Hi Carol, Thanks for your note. Pap tests aren't about STI screening; a pap test can identify abnormal cells on the cervix. So Pap smears are not related to using IUDs—or to any other type of birth control! You are right that it's a good idea to get tested for STIs. But STI testing is important for women who have risk factors for STIs—not women who want to use any particular form of birth control. STI risk factors differ by age, sexual partners, and even where you live. For some folks, regular STI tests are the norm. For example, the US Centers for Disease Control recommends that all women under age 26 get screened for Chlamydia and gonorrhea once a year. That's because these two STIs can be stealthy (i.e. no symptoms) and can cause pelvic inflammatory disease. For someone who wants to use an IUD, whether or not to test for STIs depends on when they were last tested and whether they have any risk factors for STIs. It's definitely a good topic to discuss with a healthcare provider. Medical research shows that an STI test can safely be done on the same day as the IUD insertion (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23168755) with any needed treatment given when the test results are in.

2013-09-19 17:34:13 UTC

Maria Isabel Rodriguez

I got the Mirena yesterday.It wasn't bad, it wasn't rainbows and butterflies, but I didn't cry, scream, or pass out. 3 parts that are uncomfortable, when they clamp you (quick pinch), when they "sound" you (strong cramp lasted about 10 seconds for me) , and the release of the iud (Another strong cramp, lasts about 3 seconds). Then it was over. I bled very little, and I felt fine afterwards other than some "period like" cramping. I took an 800mg ibuprofen and used a heating pad and felt fine when I got home, we even went out to dinner with our friends..however when I woke up this morning I was in a lot of pain (cramping, horrible cramping) obviously because there is a foreign object there, and my uterus wants it out. But other than that, I think it is definitely worth it. and I have never been pregnant. So far so good!

2013-10-05 20:07:12 UTC

Guest

I agree that the misoprostol does NOT work for dilating the cervix or for easing pain. Things did not go well for me when having the IUD put in. It was extremely painful. And I'm not a wimp at all. I think something must have gone wrong, as my strings are missing, but after an Ultrasound it shows the Merina is in place. I am extremely nervous about having it removed. Has anyone experienced having their Merina removed when the strings are missing? Do you know if there is any pain releaver so that I do not feel a thing?

2013-10-07 07:36:35 UTC

Kelly

I agree that the misoprostol does NOT work for dilating the cervix or for easing pain. Things did not go well for me when having the IUD put in. It was extremely painful. And I'm not a wimp at all. I think something must have gone wrong, as my strings are missing, but after an Ultrasound it shows the Merina is in place. I am extremely nervous about having it removed. Has anyone experienced having their Merina removed when the strings are missing? Do you know if there is any pain releaver so that I do not feel a thing?

2013-10-07 07:36:35 UTC

Kelly

I been having my IUD 7 months and my son is 9 months and a month before I had one dose of the depo. I have pains in my private area and around it. I so dont know which one of those unnatura things l is causing this problem. If I sit a certain wat I can feel something stabbing. I hope mine isnt expelling its self. Crazy!

2013-10-15 00:53:31 UTC

R Hart

Mine hurt and I got it 7 months ago. And still have it. I'll tell you this it hurt then and it hurts now. If you never had a baby doesnt matter its gonne hurt period point blank! I had 2 C- sectons it hurt. So if you think its a difference cuz you never had a baby out of the vagina me either But i still have 2 kids.and it still hurt . Saying it doesnt hurt it a lie! Your vagina being held wide open with some clamps. Its aching and cramping while the Dr. Is placing it then they tell you to cough. All I could think was (what TF was I thinking?) And it made me start my period the next day. I had already had one. And its worse if you actually havnt given birth vaginally. Because your cervix would be tighter and more closed than if you had a baby naturally.

2013-10-15 01:10:29 UTC

R Hart

I been having my IUD 7 months and my son is 9 months and a month before I had one dose of the depo. I have pains in my private area and around it. I so dont know which one of those unnatura things l is causing this problem. If I sit a certain wat I can feel something stabbing. I hope mine isnt expelling its self. Crazy!

2013-10-15 00:53:31 UTC

R Hart

Mine hurt and I got it 7 months ago. And still have it. I'll tell you this it hurt then and it hurts now. If you never had a baby doesnt matter its gonne hurt period point blank! I had 2 C- sectons it hurt. So if you think its a difference cuz you never had a baby out of the vagina me either But i still have 2 kids.and it still hurt . Saying it doesnt hurt it a lie! Your vagina being held wide open with some clamps. Its aching and cramping while the Dr. Is placing it then they tell you to cough. All I could think was (what TF was I thinking?) And it made me start my period the next day. I had already had one. And its worse if you actually havnt given birth vaginally. Because your cervix would be tighter and more closed than if you had a baby naturally.

2013-10-15 01:10:29 UTC

R Hart

My iud strings poke my partner and he says it's very painful. I'm 20, never had kids or been pregnant. ... insertion was painful. I wondered if it was anything comparable to contractions because hot damnnn it was the weirdest sensation of pain and pressure. I've had it for maybe 5 months now. Highly considering removal. I've heard trimming it shorter can cause it to have to be surgically removed :/

2013-10-20 21:18:27 UTC

Hannah

My husband deff could feel the strings every time we had sex. I went to the doctor and she said there was nothing she could do, if she made the strings shorter than they would not be as flexable and they would poke him more. I had my IUD removed after 3 years of trying to deal with it.

2013-11-02 09:13:38 UTC

Catherine

My husband deff could feel the strings every time we had sex. I went to the doctor and she said there was nothing she could do, if she made the strings shorter than they would not be as flexable and they would poke him more. I had my IUD removed after 3 years of trying to deal with it.

2013-11-02 09:13:38 UTC

Catherine

I just had the copper iud inserted hours ago, and it was painful. I don't have children and I wasn't told that it was gonna be painful. As far as pain for me, it was a 7 on a scale from 1 to 10. I would strongly suggest taking Motrin, Advil or Ibuprofen before and after, just to be sure. The pain starts going away after 5 hours. .. I just hope the pain is worth it. They say I can keep it in for as long as I want.

2013-11-12 21:02:44 UTC

Tina

My wife had the Mirena put in about 2 months ago. In certain positions I can feel the wires poking me, kinda feels like someone is taking a pin and poking the head, very uncomfortable and sometimes very painful. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to adjust the wires so that they are in a position to face the end away from the vagina? I would appreciate any input on this matter TY!

2013-11-15 08:28:23 UTC

Jason Gorman

I just has my copper IUD inserted yesterday and while the process was painful it was more painful afterward when the Advil began to wear off. I do have a question though. I am able to feel the strings but I cannot feel the entire two inches out of my cervix, it feels much closer to 1/2 an inch. How normal is this and should I be worried? My doctor did not have me check while I was there so I have no idea if the strings have moved since insertion or not.

2013-11-15 17:05:03 UTC

marimba_wizard

I just wanted to add that I had my Paraguard inserted yesterday and it was almost totally painless! I read this website several weeks before my appointment, and I was so scared by all the stories of the agony of insertion. But I felt almost nothing! I'm 28 and never been pregnant. I know the experience is totally subjective, but I just wanted to add my voice to those who say the process isn't bad for everyone. It felt like mild menstrual cramps when the IUD was inserted and then I had the same mild cramps for the rest of the day. I was able to walk, talk and go back to work just fine. Today my lower back is hurting but the cramps are gone. I'm so excited to have this method of birth control and not to have to worry every month that my period isn't coming and I'm pregnant. I recommend an IUD to anyone. Thanks for the great article!

2013-12-11 13:43:26 UTC

KMG

I just wanted to add that I had my Paraguard inserted yesterday and it was almost totally painless! I read this website several weeks before my appointment, and I was so scared by all the stories of the agony of insertion. But I felt almost nothing! I'm 28 and never been pregnant. I know the experience is totally subjective, but I just wanted to add my voice to those who say the process isn't bad for everyone. It felt like mild menstrual cramps when the IUD was inserted and then I had the same mild cramps for the rest of the day. I was able to walk, talk and go back to work just fine. Today my lower back is hurting but the cramps are gone. I'm so excited to have this method of birth control and not to have to worry every month that my period isn't coming and I'm pregnant. I recommend an IUD to anyone. Thanks for the great article!

2013-12-11 13:43:26 UTC

KMG

I just wanted to add that I had my Paraguard inserted yesterday and it was almost totally painless! I read this website several weeks before my appointment, and I was so scared by all the stories of the agony of insertion. But I felt almost nothing! I'm 28 and never been pregnant. I know the experience is totally subjective, but I just wanted to add my voice to those who say the process isn't bad for everyone. It felt like mild menstrual cramps when the IUD was inserted and then I had the same mild cramps for the rest of the day. I was able to walk, talk and go back to work just fine. Today my lower back is hurting but the cramps are gone. I'm so excited to have this method of birth control and not to have to worry every month that my period isn't coming and I'm pregnant. I recommend an IUD to anyone. Thanks for the great article!

2013-12-11 13:43:26 UTC

KMG

I just wanted to add that I had my Paraguard inserted yesterday and it was almost totally painless! I read this website several weeks before my appointment, and I was so scared by all the stories of the agony of insertion. But I felt almost nothing! I'm 28 and never been pregnant. I know the experience is totally subjective, but I just wanted to add my voice to those who say the process isn't bad for everyone. It felt like mild menstrual cramps when the IUD was inserted and then I had the same mild cramps for the rest of the day. I was able to walk, talk and go back to work just fine. Today my lower back is hurting but the cramps are gone. I'm so excited to have this method of birth control and not to have to worry every month that my period isn't coming and I'm pregnant. I recommend an IUD to anyone. Thanks for the great article!

2013-12-11 13:43:26 UTC

KMG

I have a question for you my marina has been in for 5 years and I'm about to get it taken out in January because the five years will be up in January and I'm just wondering if I get it taken out can I get a new IUD put it right back in or do I have to wait or I never get one put back in again cuz from the way your talking it sounds like I can get one put back in I'm just wondering if I could do it right away

2013-12-16 17:09:35 UTC

Amanda

Hi KMG - Thanks so much for sharing your story. We're so glad to hear you are loving your IUD!

2013-12-16 20:41:32 UTC

Bedsider Staff

I have a question for you my marina has been in for 5 years and I'm about to get it taken out in January because the five years will be up in January and I'm just wondering if I get it taken out can I get a new IUD put it right back in or do I have to wait or I never get one put back in again cuz from the way your talking it sounds like I can get one put back in I'm just wondering if I could do it right away

2013-12-16 17:09:35 UTC

Amanda

Hi KMG - Thanks so much for sharing your story. We're so glad to hear you are loving your IUD!

2013-12-16 20:41:32 UTC

Bedsider Staff

I have a question for you my marina has been in for 5 years and I'm about to get it taken out in January because the five years will be up in January and I'm just wondering if I get it taken out can I get a new IUD put it right back in or do I have to wait or I never get one put back in again cuz from the way your talking it sounds like I can get one put back in I'm just wondering if I could do it right away

2013-12-16 17:09:35 UTC

Amanda

Hi KMG - Thanks so much for sharing your story. We're so glad to hear you are loving your IUD!

2013-12-16 20:41:32 UTC

Bedsider Staff

Have your iud inserted on your third day of your cycle so that your cervix is open if not then yes it can be painful... if you have a good doc he/she should inform you of this before hand. S/N I strongly suggest having a paps before getting the insertion. If you have a std it's almost a guarantee you will have a major infection on your hands...

2013-12-27 08:09:49 UTC

candiicoatedd

Have your iud inserted on your third day of your cycle so that your cervix is open if not then yes it can be painful... if you have a good doc he/she should inform you of this before hand. S/N I strongly suggest having a paps before getting the insertion. If you have a std it's almost a guarantee you will have a major infection on your hands...

2013-12-27 08:09:49 UTC

candiicoatedd

Got my Mirena yesterday. While I am having monogamous sex, I got it more because whamming baseball bat-sized "Ultra" tampons up my baby-snout every three hours for my period was awful. I made the decision to get the Mirena because I can barely remember to finish a Z-Pack of 5 pills, let alone take a pill every day I've never used any other birth control. Here's what happened during my appointment. 1. Lie on the table, put your feet in the stirrups, apologize to the nurse practitioner because it seems appropriate to apologize to people who have to play with vaginas. Contemplate why you think this is for a second while she pulls your but cheeks closer to the edge of the table and you try not to fart a little. 2. She lubes up the speculum and stretched your lady garden open more than you'd like. This is uncomfortable for me, but then I start singing songs from Sweeney Todd inside my head. The doc tells me she's wiping my vagina and cervix with betadine. 3. Nurse tells you to cough and then she clamps this thing on your cervix to make sure it doesn't shift during takeoff and landing or something. Start humming La Marseillaise loudly into your hands. 4. Nurse tells you that she's going to sound your uterus. This does not mean she will be yodeling into it to check for an echo. She will be poking a stick a little narrower than a pencil into it to check its depth. At this point you will have "How Deep is Your Love" looping in your head, and you will wonder what is wrong with you. 5. Nurse sounds your uterus. This is probably the worst part of the whole shebang. It pretty much feels like an especially bad menstrual cramp, so if your bad cramps knock you out for a day, this'll probably knock you out for a day too. Mine do not knock me out because I am used to them. I started singing The Star-Spangled Banner loudly into my hands and warned the nurse that I kind of had a super-strong urge to poop. She asked that I refrain. I obliged. 6. The nurse removes the sound and puts a tube in your cervix that contains the Mirena. She pushes the Mirena up through the tube where it enters your uterus and unfurls like a beautiful butterfly of worry-free birth control. You will have a cramp of similar intensity to but shorter duration than the one when she sounded you. 7. The nurse will tell you that you've done a beautiful job and will remove the tube and trim your strings. She will then remove what has come to feel like a bear trap from around your cervix, and will finally withdraw the speculum. You will probably have a little vaginal pain from that, and the betadine may cause a bit of burning, but you will likely be given a baby wipe which will help. I had no cramping immediately after the procedure (the 800mgs of ibuprofen pre-procedure helped), but as the day wore on, I had some cramps and bleeding. Today I've had some backache, but moving around helped. I'm in the lookout for anything that would signal an infection, and tomorrow I will be checking for my strings. Thanks for taking the time to read, and I hope that your procedure is easy. Mine was not painless (I'm 24 and have never had a kid), but it was tolerable, and it always helps to go in with a sense of humor. Good luck ladies!

2014-01-02 04:08:36 UTC

SarahBear

Got my Mirena yesterday. While I am having monogamous sex, I got it more because whamming baseball bat-sized "Ultra" tampons up my baby-snout every three hours for my period was awful. I made the decision to get the Mirena because I can barely remember to finish a Z-Pack of 5 pills, let alone take a pill every day I've never used any other birth control. Here's what happened during my appointment. 1. Lie on the table, put your feet in the stirrups, apologize to the nurse practitioner because it seems appropriate to apologize to people who have to play with vaginas. Contemplate why you think this is for a second while she pulls your but cheeks closer to the edge of the table and you try not to fart a little. 2. She lubes up the speculum and stretched your lady garden open more than you'd like. This is uncomfortable for me, but then I start singing songs from Sweeney Todd inside my head. The doc tells me she's wiping my vagina and cervix with betadine. 3. Nurse tells you to cough and then she clamps this thing on your cervix to make sure it doesn't shift during takeoff and landing or something. Start humming La Marseillaise loudly into your hands. 4. Nurse tells you that she's going to sound your uterus. This does not mean she will be yodeling into it to check for an echo. She will be poking a stick a little narrower than a pencil into it to check its depth. At this point you will have "How Deep is Your Love" looping in your head, and you will wonder what is wrong with you. 5. Nurse sounds your uterus. This is probably the worst part of the whole shebang. It pretty much feels like an especially bad menstrual cramp, so if your bad cramps knock you out for a day, this'll probably knock you out for a day too. Mine do not knock me out because I am used to them. I started singing The Star-Spangled Banner loudly into my hands and warned the nurse that I kind of had a super-strong urge to poop. She asked that I refrain. I obliged. 6. The nurse removes the sound and puts a tube in your cervix that contains the Mirena. She pushes the Mirena up through the tube where it enters your uterus and unfurls like a beautiful butterfly of worry-free birth control. You will have a cramp of similar intensity to but shorter duration than the one when she sounded you. 7. The nurse will tell you that you've done a beautiful job and will remove the tube and trim your strings. She will then remove what has come to feel like a bear trap from around your cervix, and will finally withdraw the speculum. You will probably have a little vaginal pain from that, and the betadine may cause a bit of burning, but you will likely be given a baby wipe which will help. I had no cramping immediately after the procedure (the 800mgs of ibuprofen pre-procedure helped), but as the day wore on, I had some cramps and bleeding. Today I've had some backache, but moving around helped. I'm in the lookout for anything that would signal an infection, and tomorrow I will be checking for my strings. Thanks for taking the time to read, and I hope that your procedure is easy. Mine was not painless (I'm 24 and have never had a kid), but it was tolerable, and it always helps to go in with a sense of humor. Good luck ladies!

2014-01-02 04:08:36 UTC

SarahBear

Got my Mirena yesterday. While I am having monogamous sex, I got it more because whamming baseball bat-sized "Ultra" tampons up my baby-snout every three hours for my period was awful. I made the decision to get the Mirena because I can barely remember to finish a Z-Pack of 5 pills, let alone take a pill every day I've never used any other birth control. Here's what happened during my appointment. 1. Lie on the table, put your feet in the stirrups, apologize to the nurse practitioner because it seems appropriate to apologize to people who have to play with vaginas. Contemplate why you think this is for a second while she pulls your but cheeks closer to the edge of the table and you try not to fart a little. 2. She lubes up the speculum and stretched your lady garden open more than you'd like. This is uncomfortable for me, but then I start singing songs from Sweeney Todd inside my head. The doc tells me she's wiping my vagina and cervix with betadine. 3. Nurse tells you to cough and then she clamps this thing on your cervix to make sure it doesn't shift during takeoff and landing or something. Start humming La Marseillaise loudly into your hands. 4. Nurse tells you that she's going to sound your uterus. This does not mean she will be yodeling into it to check for an echo. She will be poking a stick a little narrower than a pencil into it to check its depth. At this point you will have "How Deep is Your Love" looping in your head, and you will wonder what is wrong with you. 5. Nurse sounds your uterus. This is probably the worst part of the whole shebang. It pretty much feels like an especially bad menstrual cramp, so if your bad cramps knock you out for a day, this'll probably knock you out for a day too. Mine do not knock me out because I am used to them. I started singing The Star-Spangled Banner loudly into my hands and warned the nurse that I kind of had a super-strong urge to poop. She asked that I refrain. I obliged. 6. The nurse removes the sound and puts a tube in your cervix that contains the Mirena. She pushes the Mirena up through the tube where it enters your uterus and unfurls like a beautiful butterfly of worry-free birth control. You will have a cramp of similar intensity to but shorter duration than the one when she sounded you. 7. The nurse will tell you that you've done a beautiful job and will remove the tube and trim your strings. She will then remove what has come to feel like a bear trap from around your cervix, and will finally withdraw the speculum. You will probably have a little vaginal pain from that, and the betadine may cause a bit of burning, but you will likely be given a baby wipe which will help. I had no cramping immediately after the procedure (the 800mgs of ibuprofen pre-procedure helped), but as the day wore on, I had some cramps and bleeding. Today I've had some backache, but moving around helped. I'm in the lookout for anything that would signal an infection, and tomorrow I will be checking for my strings. Thanks for taking the time to read, and I hope that your procedure is easy. Mine was not painless (I'm 24 and have never had a kid), but it was tolerable, and it always helps to go in with a sense of humor. Good luck ladies!

2014-01-02 04:08:36 UTC

SarahBear

Got my Mirena yesterday. While I am having monogamous sex, I got it more because whamming baseball bat-sized "Ultra" tampons up my baby-snout every three hours for my period was awful. I made the decision to get the Mirena because I can barely remember to finish a Z-Pack of 5 pills, let alone take a pill every day I've never used any other birth control. Here's what happened during my appointment. 1. Lie on the table, put your feet in the stirrups, apologize to the nurse practitioner because it seems appropriate to apologize to people who have to play with vaginas. Contemplate why you think this is for a second while she pulls your but cheeks closer to the edge of the table and you try not to fart a little. 2. She lubes up the speculum and stretched your lady garden open more than you'd like. This is uncomfortable for me, but then I start singing songs from Sweeney Todd inside my head. The doc tells me she's wiping my vagina and cervix with betadine. 3. Nurse tells you to cough and then she clamps this thing on your cervix to make sure it doesn't shift during takeoff and landing or something. Start humming La Marseillaise loudly into your hands. 4. Nurse tells you that she's going to sound your uterus. This does not mean she will be yodeling into it to check for an echo. She will be poking a stick a little narrower than a pencil into it to check its depth. At this point you will have "How Deep is Your Love" looping in your head, and you will wonder what is wrong with you. 5. Nurse sounds your uterus. This is probably the worst part of the whole shebang. It pretty much feels like an especially bad menstrual cramp, so if your bad cramps knock you out for a day, this'll probably knock you out for a day too. Mine do not knock me out because I am used to them. I started singing The Star-Spangled Banner loudly into my hands and warned the nurse that I kind of had a super-strong urge to poop. She asked that I refrain. I obliged. 6. The nurse removes the sound and puts a tube in your cervix that contains the Mirena. She pushes the Mirena up through the tube where it enters your uterus and unfurls like a beautiful butterfly of worry-free birth control. You will have a cramp of similar intensity to but shorter duration than the one when she sounded you. 7. The nurse will tell you that you've done a beautiful job and will remove the tube and trim your strings. She will then remove what has come to feel like a bear trap from around your cervix, and will finally withdraw the speculum. You will probably have a little vaginal pain from that, and the betadine may cause a bit of burning, but you will likely be given a baby wipe which will help. I had no cramping immediately after the procedure (the 800mgs of ibuprofen pre-procedure helped), but as the day wore on, I had some cramps and bleeding. Today I've had some backache, but moving around helped. I'm in the lookout for anything that would signal an infection, and tomorrow I will be checking for my strings. Thanks for taking the time to read, and I hope that your procedure is easy. Mine was not painless (I'm 24 and have never had a kid), but it was tolerable, and it always helps to go in with a sense of humor. Good luck ladies!

2014-01-02 04:08:36 UTC

SarahBear

Got my Mirena yesterday. While I am having monogamous sex, I got it more because whamming baseball bat-sized "Ultra" tampons up my baby-snout every three hours for my period was awful. I made the decision to get the Mirena because I can barely remember to finish a Z-Pack of 5 pills, let alone take a pill every day I've never used any other birth control. Here's what happened during my appointment. 1. Lie on the table, put your feet in the stirrups, apologize to the nurse practitioner because it seems appropriate to apologize to people who have to play with vaginas. Contemplate why you think this is for a second while she pulls your but cheeks closer to the edge of the table and you try not to fart a little. 2. She lubes up the speculum and stretched your lady garden open more than you'd like. This is uncomfortable for me, but then I start singing songs from Sweeney Todd inside my head. The doc tells me she's wiping my vagina and cervix with betadine. 3. Nurse tells you to cough and then she clamps this thing on your cervix to make sure it doesn't shift during takeoff and landing or something. Start humming La Marseillaise loudly into your hands. 4. Nurse tells you that she's going to sound your uterus. This does not mean she will be yodeling into it to check for an echo. She will be poking a stick a little narrower than a pencil into it to check its depth. At this point you will have "How Deep is Your Love" looping in your head, and you will wonder what is wrong with you. 5. Nurse sounds your uterus. This is probably the worst part of the whole shebang. It pretty much feels like an especially bad menstrual cramp, so if your bad cramps knock you out for a day, this'll probably knock you out for a day too. Mine do not knock me out because I am used to them. I started singing The Star-Spangled Banner loudly into my hands and warned the nurse that I kind of had a super-strong urge to poop. She asked that I refrain. I obliged. 6. The nurse removes the sound and puts a tube in your cervix that contains the Mirena. She pushes the Mirena up through the tube where it enters your uterus and unfurls like a beautiful butterfly of worry-free birth control. You will have a cramp of similar intensity to but shorter duration than the one when she sounded you. 7. The nurse will tell you that you've done a beautiful job and will remove the tube and trim your strings. She will then remove what has come to feel like a bear trap from around your cervix, and will finally withdraw the speculum. You will probably have a little vaginal pain from that, and the betadine may cause a bit of burning, but you will likely be given a baby wipe which will help. I had no cramping immediately after the procedure (the 800mgs of ibuprofen pre-procedure helped), but as the day wore on, I had some cramps and bleeding. Today I've had some backache, but moving around helped. I'm in the lookout for anything that would signal an infection, and tomorrow I will be checking for my strings. Thanks for taking the time to read, and I hope that your procedure is easy. Mine was not painless (I'm 24 and have never had a kid), but it was tolerable, and it always helps to go in with a sense of humor. Good luck ladies!

2014-01-02 04:08:36 UTC

SarahBear

Got my Mirena yesterday. While I am having monogamous sex, I got it more because whamming baseball bat-sized "Ultra" tampons up my baby-snout every three hours for my period was awful. I made the decision to get the Mirena because I can barely remember to finish a Z-Pack of 5 pills, let alone take a pill every day I've never used any other birth control. Here's what happened during my appointment. 1. Lie on the table, put your feet in the stirrups, apologize to the nurse practitioner because it seems appropriate to apologize to people who have to play with vaginas. Contemplate why you think this is for a second while she pulls your but cheeks closer to the edge of the table and you try not to fart a little. 2. She lubes up the speculum and stretched your lady garden open more than you'd like. This is uncomfortable for me, but then I start singing songs from Sweeney Todd inside my head. The doc tells me she's wiping my vagina and cervix with betadine. 3. Nurse tells you to cough and then she clamps this thing on your cervix to make sure it doesn't shift during takeoff and landing or something. Start humming La Marseillaise loudly into your hands. 4. Nurse tells you that she's going to sound your uterus. This does not mean she will be yodeling into it to check for an echo. She will be poking a stick a little narrower than a pencil into it to check its depth. At this point you will have "How Deep is Your Love" looping in your head, and you will wonder what is wrong with you. 5. Nurse sounds your uterus. This is probably the worst part of the whole shebang. It pretty much feels like an especially bad menstrual cramp, so if your bad cramps knock you out for a day, this'll probably knock you out for a day too. Mine do not knock me out because I am used to them. I started singing The Star-Spangled Banner loudly into my hands and warned the nurse that I kind of had a super-strong urge to poop. She asked that I refrain. I obliged. 6. The nurse removes the sound and puts a tube in your cervix that contains the Mirena. She pushes the Mirena up through the tube where it enters your uterus and unfurls like a beautiful butterfly of worry-free birth control. You will have a cramp of similar intensity to but shorter duration than the one when she sounded you. 7. The nurse will tell you that you've done a beautiful job and will remove the tube and trim your strings. She will then remove what has come to feel like a bear trap from around your cervix, and will finally withdraw the speculum. You will probably have a little vaginal pain from that, and the betadine may cause a bit of burning, but you will likely be given a baby wipe which will help. I had no cramping immediately after the procedure (the 800mgs of ibuprofen pre-procedure helped), but as the day wore on, I had some cramps and bleeding. Today I've had some backache, but moving around helped. I'm in the lookout for anything that would signal an infection, and tomorrow I will be checking for my strings. Thanks for taking the time to read, and I hope that your procedure is easy. Mine was not painless (I'm 24 and have never had a kid), but it was tolerable, and it always helps to go in with a sense of humor. Good luck ladies!

2014-01-02 04:08:36 UTC

SarahBear

Got my Mirena yesterday. While I am having monogamous sex, I got it more because whamming baseball bat-sized "Ultra" tampons up my baby-snout every three hours for my period was awful. I made the decision to get the Mirena because I can barely remember to finish a Z-Pack of 5 pills, let alone take a pill every day I've never used any other birth control. Here's what happened during my appointment. 1. Lie on the table, put your feet in the stirrups, apologize to the nurse practitioner because it seems appropriate to apologize to people who have to play with vaginas. Contemplate why you think this is for a second while she pulls your but cheeks closer to the edge of the table and you try not to fart a little. 2. She lubes up the speculum and stretched your lady garden open more than you'd like. This is uncomfortable for me, but then I start singing songs from Sweeney Todd inside my head. The doc tells me she's wiping my vagina and cervix with betadine. 3. Nurse tells you to cough and then she clamps this thing on your cervix to make sure it doesn't shift during takeoff and landing or something. Start humming La Marseillaise loudly into your hands. 4. Nurse tells you that she's going to sound your uterus. This does not mean she will be yodeling into it to check for an echo. She will be poking a stick a little narrower than a pencil into it to check its depth. At this point you will have "How Deep is Your Love" looping in your head, and you will wonder what is wrong with you. 5. Nurse sounds your uterus. This is probably the worst part of the whole shebang. It pretty much feels like an especially bad menstrual cramp, so if your bad cramps knock you out for a day, this'll probably knock you out for a day too. Mine do not knock me out because I am used to them. I started singing The Star-Spangled Banner loudly into my hands and warned the nurse that I kind of had a super-strong urge to poop. She asked that I refrain. I obliged. 6. The nurse removes the sound and puts a tube in your cervix that contains the Mirena. She pushes the Mirena up through the tube where it enters your uterus and unfurls like a beautiful butterfly of worry-free birth control. You will have a cramp of similar intensity to but shorter duration than the one when she sounded you. 7. The nurse will tell you that you've done a beautiful job and will remove the tube and trim your strings. She will then remove what has come to feel like a bear trap from around your cervix, and will finally withdraw the speculum. You will probably have a little vaginal pain from that, and the betadine may cause a bit of burning, but you will likely be given a baby wipe which will help. I had no cramping immediately after the procedure (the 800mgs of ibuprofen pre-procedure helped), but as the day wore on, I had some cramps and bleeding. Today I've had some backache, but moving around helped. I'm in the lookout for anything that would signal an infection, and tomorrow I will be checking for my strings. Thanks for taking the time to read, and I hope that your procedure is easy. Mine was not painless (I'm 24 and have never had a kid), but it was tolerable, and it always helps to go in with a sense of humor. Good luck ladies!

2014-01-02 04:08:36 UTC

SarahBear

Got my Mirena yesterday. While I am having monogamous sex, I got it more because whamming baseball bat-sized "Ultra" tampons up my baby-snout every three hours for my period was awful. I made the decision to get the Mirena because I can barely remember to finish a Z-Pack of 5 pills, let alone take a pill every day I've never used any other birth control. Here's what happened during my appointment. 1. Lie on the table, put your feet in the stirrups, apologize to the nurse practitioner because it seems appropriate to apologize to people who have to play with vaginas. Contemplate why you think this is for a second while she pulls your but cheeks closer to the edge of the table and you try not to fart a little. 2. She lubes up the speculum and stretched your lady garden open more than you'd like. This is uncomfortable for me, but then I start singing songs from Sweeney Todd inside my head. The doc tells me she's wiping my vagina and cervix with betadine. 3. Nurse tells you to cough and then she clamps this thing on your cervix to make sure it doesn't shift during takeoff and landing or something. Start humming La Marseillaise loudly into your hands. 4. Nurse tells you that she's going to sound your uterus. This does not mean she will be yodeling into it to check for an echo. She will be poking a stick a little narrower than a pencil into it to check its depth. At this point you will have "How Deep is Your Love" looping in your head, and you will wonder what is wrong with you. 5. Nurse sounds your uterus. This is probably the worst part of the whole shebang. It pretty much feels like an especially bad menstrual cramp, so if your bad cramps knock you out for a day, this'll probably knock you out for a day too. Mine do not knock me out because I am used to them. I started singing The Star-Spangled Banner loudly into my hands and warned the nurse that I kind of had a super-strong urge to poop. She asked that I refrain. I obliged. 6. The nurse removes the sound and puts a tube in your cervix that contains the Mirena. She pushes the Mirena up through the tube where it enters your uterus and unfurls like a beautiful butterfly of worry-free birth control. You will have a cramp of similar intensity to but shorter duration than the one when she sounded you. 7. The nurse will tell you that you've done a beautiful job and will remove the tube and trim your strings. She will then remove what has come to feel like a bear trap from around your cervix, and will finally withdraw the speculum. You will probably have a little vaginal pain from that, and the betadine may cause a bit of burning, but you will likely be given a baby wipe which will help. I had no cramping immediately after the procedure (the 800mgs of ibuprofen pre-procedure helped), but as the day wore on, I had some cramps and bleeding. Today I've had some backache, but moving around helped. I'm in the lookout for anything that would signal an infection, and tomorrow I will be checking for my strings. Thanks for taking the time to read, and I hope that your procedure is easy. Mine was not painless (I'm 24 and have never had a kid), but it was tolerable, and it always helps to go in with a sense of humor. Good luck ladies!

2014-01-02 04:08:36 UTC

SarahBear

I just had an IUD inserted less than a week ago, and already feel pretty great. I've never been pregnant and was a little concerned with all the different information floating around. My doctor let me know there would be 3 distinct moments of cramping/discomfort during the process: 1) opening of the cervix 2) measuring the uterus and 3) actual insertion of the IUD (paragard for me). Of all three, the measuring of the uterus was actually the most uncomfortable and caused the most intense and uncomfortable cramp and contraction, I had never felt one like that before. After a few deep inhales and exhales and trying to relax, and after a few moments of this after it was inserted as well, the cramping subsided a bit. Really quite manageable. I actually felt really perfect during the day for about 3 days but would get (what felt like) unusual cramping and almost gas-like feeling in my uterus at night around 10pm and last for several hours, eased with a heat pad and a pamprin/midol. That too has subsided as my body continues to adjust - everything is packed so close together in our bodies! The experience and body's reaction will be different for everyone, sure, but I think it is a fantastic option for women to look into, especially in pursuit of reliable, hormone-free (in case of ParaGard) reproductive health care. I can still tell my body is adjusting and getting used to its presence but I really think it was the best decision I could have made for myself.

2014-01-04 18:46:58 UTC

Cory

Hi Hannah - That's a bummer that your IUD strings are bothering your partner. The strings get softer over time, so the problem may resolve itself. SuperDaisy suggests some other strategies below, and you can also talk to your nurse or doctor about options. Good luck!

2014-01-08 02:20:59 UTC

Maria Isabel Rodriguez

Hi Leslie - You can have an IUD placed any time as long as you're certain you're not pregnant. It doesn't have to be during your period, but it can be.

2014-01-08 02:24:22 UTC

Maria Isabel Rodriguez

Were you on your period when you went? I wanna get one and my dr says its best to come then.

2014-01-20 21:20:47 UTC

lexi

Hi Amanda! You certainly can get a new IUD put in on the same day an IUD is removed, and many women chose to do this. There's no medical reason to get this done on separate days.

2014-01-20 22:59:13 UTC

Colleen Krajewski, MD, MPH

Hi Cory! Thanks for sharing your story for everyone. It sounds really typical of most women who have an IUD!

2014-01-20 23:00:46 UTC

Colleen Krajewski, MD, MPH

Hi Martin, thanks for your questions! 1. Depends on the IUD. With the copper IUD (Paragard), it's effective immediately. With the progestin IUD (Mirena) it depends on the timing of insertion, and a woman should check with her provider. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr6205a1.htm 2. Since the IUD itself is in the uterus, if correclty placed it shouldn't be felt during intercourse (which is in the vagina, not uterus), no matter what the sex position is. IUD strings are in the vagina, and typically aren't felt once they soften after the first few weeks, again regardless of sex position.

2014-01-22 19:12:17 UTC

Colleen Krajewski, MD, MPH

I'm getting one on Tuesday and am taking misoprostol Monday night/Tuesday morning to prepare for it. I have a couple of questions about it - Will the misoprostol cause me to bleed heavily on Tuesday before the insertion? If so, am I supposed to wear a tampon or a pad? And for how long does the misprostol cause a person to bleed? I'm supposed to be going away with my husband for the following weekend (5 days later) and I don't want heavy bleeding to get in the way.

2014-01-29 13:51:07 UTC

C S

I'm getting one on Tuesday and am taking misoprostol Monday night/Tuesday morning to prepare for it. I have a couple of questions about it - Will the misoprostol cause me to bleed heavily on Tuesday before the insertion? If so, am I supposed to wear a tampon or a pad? And for how long does the misprostol cause a person to bleed? I'm supposed to be going away with my husband for the following weekend (5 days later) and I don't want heavy bleeding to get in the way.

2014-01-29 13:51:07 UTC

C S

Yeah my boyfriend can feel the IUD if he fingers or is havin intercourse with me. And actually the strong once went inside him. My doctor said you should feel the strong with your finger to make sure it is still in place. So that last myth is a crock.

2014-02-03 15:09:14 UTC

Alyg

Yeah my boyfriend can feel the IUD if he fingers or is havin intercourse with me. And actually the strong once went inside him. My doctor said you should feel the strong with your finger to make sure it is still in place. So that last myth is a crock.

2014-02-03 15:09:14 UTC

Alyg

I read SO many posts by other women about their experiences, and it really freaked me out. The most important thing to remember is that everyone experiences pain differently, and everyone will experience this procedure differently. I had my Mirena IUD inserted yesterday. Here's what it was like: I am 24 years old, never given birth/had an abortion/been pregnant. My periods are usually heavy and short with moderately painful cramps. I have IBS - some people have said that their IBS affected the insertion or was affected by it, I just had diarrhea early in the morning because I was nervous and that's what happens when I get nervous. I didn't have any other complications with IBS. The procedure wasn't done within the first 7 days of my cycle like some people suggest, so I guess my cervix was as clamped shut as possible. I did not have a muscle relaxer beforehand as my doctor said that recent studies show that these don't do much to help and can actually increase bleeding. I did take 800mg of Ibuprofen about an hour before the procedure. My appointment was at the hospital (that's where my gynecologist's office is) at about 9 30 am. I showed up early, was taken to an exam room to undress from the waist down and lay down with a sheet covering me. I laid like this for at least 20 minutes before anyone came in. This was probably a good thing since after 20 minutes I was more annoyed than nervous. I used this time to close my eyes, do some deep breathing, and relax as much as possible. I knew things wouldn't go as smoothly if my body was tensed up from nerves. My doctor came in, talked to me for a few minutes and explained the procedure. After inserting the speculum he sanitised my cervix with a solution that looked like iodine, but he didn't say what it was. Then he performed a cervical block. I didn't know he was going to do this when I made the appointment, and I was nervous when he said he was going to as the thought of a needle inserted into my cervix did not sound appealing. I figured that he knew what he was doing, though, so I just tried to prepare myself mentally for it. He explained that it would numb my cervix, I might feel light-headed, my heart might start to race and I might have difficulty breathing for a few minutes but that this was all perfectly normal and would go away on its own. When he had finished saying this, he started to open the Mirena packaging. I asked "Did you already do the needle?" He had! I didn't feel a thing. Then he opened my cercvix with the tenaculum - this was uncomfortable, but not too bad. He then inserted the Mirena applicator, which I think is also used to measure your cervix and placement of the IUD. This was painful, I had been warned by friends that it would feel like a bad period cramp, but that's not what I felt. It was a very sharp localised pain. It hurt pretty badly, but it wasn't a scream-out-loud type of pain, more like a wincing, grimacing, grab onto to something and hold your breath pain. It was over in under 30 seconds, and then the procedure was done. I didn't get nauseous or light heated but I was shaking a lot. The doctor told me to stay laying down for a few minutes until the shaking stopped, and explained that it was caused by adrenaline. After a few minutes he helped me to sit up and he gave me a pad and some wash cloths. There was a little bathroom attached to the exam room so I went in there to clean up - the sanitising solution and a little blood was coming out. I then got dressed and left, feeling pretty good. I had someone drive me to and from the hospital in case I was in too much pain to do the 30 minute drive home myself. I probably could have driven myself home since my cramps didn't start until about 10 minutes after the procedure and the started out reasonably small.But, after about 30 minutes they had gotten A LOT worse. I expected to be crampy for the day, but I was expecting period-like cramps. I think a lot of women experience it that way, but I didn't. Eventually my abdomen, legs, and back were all cramping worse than any cramp I had ever felt, and I couldn't get in any position that made me comfortable. A few times I was moaning out loud because of the pain. I would describe it as what I imagine labour to be like, and from what I've read, some women who have had children say their cramps after the IUD were similar to early labour pains. I used heating pads and took some more ibuprofen after a couple hours. I spent most of the day laying or sitting on the couch, whichever was more comfortable, and watching TV since I didn't feel up to doing anything else. The bad cramps lasted for about 4 or 5 hours. I was bleeding enough to need a pad rather than a panty liner, but the bleeding wasn't as much as my period usually is. Later on in the evening I was still in a good deal of pain from cramps, but I didn't feel like I was in labour anymore. The pain overall was bad, but not unbearable. I used the heating pad and ibuprofen all day. When I woke up this morning, my cramps were almost completely gone. I've had a few twinges here and there, and every once in a while I'll get a mild cramp that lasts for a few minutes, maybe 15 minutes at most. I've almost stopped bleeding completely. In general I feel pretty much like normal today. I even shovelled my driveway this afternoon (Canada - yay snow!) and I'm planning to go out with friends tonight. The labour-like cramps were bad, worse than the actual insertion in my opinion since they lasted so long, but when compared to the next 5 years of light periods and condom-free sex I say it was definitely worth it! So don't worry too much - yes some women have bad experiences, but that doesn't mean you will. And if it is really painful, guess what? Women are tough, we can handle it!

2014-02-06 21:36:01 UTC

Jenna

My insertion was like a mild period pain - but holy crap did I get pwned by the next 24 hours, where it felt like early labour. Everyone varies.

2014-02-07 21:09:29 UTC

ErynnSilver

I too didn't find it that painfu;. I expect it varies between women and providrs - get an experianced person to do it andit'll prbably hurt less.

2014-02-07 21:11:01 UTC

ErynnSilver

I don't usually comment on these things but as I am looking for advise on problems I'm facing with copper coil I found this article very misleading! I am 24 and haven't had a child, so insertion is more difficult for doctors. This is my third coil in 1 1/2 years and it is coming out again, for the third time!! I am really upset- it's a total lie to say that it isn't incredibly painful to insert if you haven't had children. I have had to take a day off work each time I had it put in, which is annoying. Because it's hard to insert, they keep coming out, but not all the way out, just low enough so you can feel the tip of the alien body inside you which is pretty horrible. I'm in the UK and they don't even give you anesthetic of any sort, which I find absolutely barbaric! My partner CAN feel the coil during sex, and worse for me- so can I. It pushes against my insides which is really uncomfortable and worrying, and obviously a bit off putting! I don't think this is something you should take light heartedly, but I have no other option as I am not willing to take hormones of any sort and don't want a child! I would advise getting it inserted in a sexual health clinic where they know what they are doing and do it often as I don't trust that doctors in the UK are properly trained in fitting it correctly. Mine didn't even believe me when I said it was coming out!

2014-02-12 12:05:08 UTC

Sylvia

I don't usually comment on these things but as I am looking for advise on problems I'm facing with copper coil I found this article very misleading! I am 24 and haven't had a child, so insertion is more difficult for doctors. This is my third coil in 1 1/2 years and it is coming out again, for the third time!! I am really upset- it's a total lie to say that it isn't incredibly painful to insert if you haven't had children. I have had to take a day off work each time I had it put in, which is annoying. Because it's hard to insert, they keep coming out, but not all the way out, just low enough so you can feel the tip of the alien body inside you which is pretty horrible. I'm in the UK and they don't even give you anesthetic of any sort, which I find absolutely barbaric! My partner CAN feel the coil during sex, and worse for me- so can I. It pushes against my insides which is really uncomfortable and worrying, and obviously a bit off putting! I don't think this is something you should take light heartedly, but I have no other option as I am not willing to take hormones of any sort and don't want a child! I would advise getting it inserted in a sexual health clinic where they know what they are doing and do it often as I don't trust that doctors in the UK are properly trained in fitting it correctly. Mine didn't even believe me when I said it was coming out!

2014-02-12 12:05:08 UTC

Sylvia

Me again! Thought I would provide an update in case anyone is interested. The day after the insertion was pretty great overall, but the cramps did come back after that. Not the terrible childbirth cramps! I just had moderate period-like cramps for 4 or 5 days afterwards. I had spotting for a couple days, then none for about a week and a half, and I've been have it again for almost a week but I think it's because I started my period on Friday. It's A LOT lighter than usual, but my cramps are worse than usual. They're quite bad. It's not like I can't move or anything, but it's definitely painful to the point of distraction. Heating pads help a bit, but I think I'm going to break down and take some ibuprofen. My partner and I have a long distance relationship so I haven't seen him since I had the IUD inserted and can't comment yet about the strings being poke-y... I really hope they aren't because I'm going to see him next week for the first time in six months, so... I really hope there's no problem to make the experience uncomfortable, we only get limited opportunities!

2014-02-23 20:19:33 UTC

Jenna

After having 3 kids and 2 of them without pain relievers, I though getting an IUD would be a piece of cake but it was very painful. I had to come back a second time and have another Dr. try and get it in properly. I can't believe I even went back in a second time but my periods are Very heavy and painful. After about 6 months of the IUD, I really do like it however I feel like about every 14 days I am cramping, tired, hungry and grumpy. I have started researching to see if others seem to have the same symptoms. Its a PMS ever 14 days rather then 28 days. That kinda sucks for sure!!

2014-03-05 00:12:41 UTC

Sharon Johnson

Does anyone experience PMS more often like about every 14 days rather then a normal cycle? I feel like I only have about one good week and then I am back to be grumpy, tired, hungry and cramping.

2014-03-05 00:14:22 UTC

Sharon Johnson

Mine fell out four times I've had a daughter but I had a c section mine was painful and my ex husband actually hit my iud pretty hard one night and ended up getting stitches

2014-03-05 17:00:37 UTC

kayp

Yeah, well, mine was painful. Very painful, and was for sometime, but still ultimately worthwhile.

2014-03-05 17:44:05 UTC

Breah Olczak

Hi Jackie, and thanks for your important question. A pap smear tests for cervical cancer, or precursors to it. It is not medically necessary to have this tested before getting an IUD, since the two issues are not related. Paps aren't even recommended in women younger than 21, but younger women can totally still use the IUD! With regard to testing for STI's like gonorrhea and chlamydia, the CDC (those are the people who set testing and treatment guidelines for the country) say that for a low risk woman, it's okay to test for STIs at the time of IUD insertion - that means you don't have to wait for test results to get your IUD in. We can help you find a doctor near you. http://bedsider.org/where_to_get_it

2014-03-06 03:49:08 UTC

Colleen Krajewski, MD, MPH

If you have unprotected sex while on your period and using the IUD can you become pregnant

2014-03-06 06:27:27 UTC

madison

it 's taken about 4 months, but the pains do fade over time. i rarely get any sort of cramping now. if they do happen, they don't last more than a few hours. lots of ibuprofen & time.

2014-03-12 15:29:53 UTC

coco watson

it 's taken about 4 months, but the pains do fade over time. i rarely get any sort of cramping now. if they do happen, they don't last more than a few hours. lots of ibuprofen & time.

2014-03-12 15:29:53 UTC

coco watson

Right there with you - just left my second IUD insertion - first one took 5 minutes I had period like cramps for about 3 days, with this one I just about jumped off the table . And I have a high tolerance for pain . I cried like a little baby.

2014-03-13 20:43:04 UTC

Michelle Anne Knight

Right there with you - just left my second IUD insertion - first one took 5 minutes I had period like cramps for about 3 days, with this one I just about jumped off the table . And I have a high tolerance for pain . I cried like a little baby.

2014-03-13 20:43:04 UTC

Michelle Anne Knight

Hi CoCo. How has sex been with your Mirena, if you don't mind me asking? I'm on day 5 of my Mirena. I dont have much cramping right now, but still feel somewhat tender.

2014-03-22 14:11:37 UTC

AshleySmashley

I am shocked at all the people saying that the mirena hurt when put in. I mean I believe you, but mine was so painless that I didn't even know I done. I have had 3 kids though and I heard it hurts less if you have had children. But wow I'm sorry yall!

2014-03-23 04:19:58 UTC

Kelly

Just had mine inserted 4 days ago while I was on my period. Now I am trying to find the string and cant locate it. I thought it was suppose to be easy to find. How far up in to the vagina is it found.

2014-03-24 15:36:00 UTC

disqus_yDY151oT4n

I've had the ParaGard for a few months now, and I've always been able to feel a little bit of the string. I recently started using a Diva Cup instead of pads/tampons because I thought it would catch my flow better, which has become extremely heavy since starting the ParaGard. Now I feel a lot more of the string. Should I be concerned?

2014-03-24 21:27:09 UTC

EsisDoza

I'm 21, and have never been pregnant. After a long (lonnngggg) love/ hate relationship with the pill, which usually made me throw up or bleed constantly (yes, even the Nuvaring and progesterone-only didn't work out for me, I've tried it all!), I decided it was best for me to get a Paraguard IUD. I was immediately attracted to the idea of hormone-free contraception after my ordeal and my aversion to increasing my chances of getting cancer. So, 5 days ago I got it and although it was easily one of the most painful experiences of my life (not to scare you away from the idea, maybe I'm a bit dramatic), but I have no regrets yet. But it was only extremely painful when they measured my uterus, which the Dr. had to do twice because I was a baby and jolted. Thank god that only lasted like 30 seconds. The rest though, wasn't so bad. I felt a little dizzy after but nothing else too bad except for moderate cramping that's gotten a little better since then. My dr. had prescribed me something to dilate my cervix initially, and due to some mix ups, I wasn't able to take it for the procedure but luckily, she gave me valium. If I can offer some advice, check with your doctor and see if they can provide you something to dilate your cervix, I think it would have helped me a lot. Oh, and a little Valium never hurts, either!

2014-03-25 22:49:20 UTC

Sarah F.

I'm 21, and have never been pregnant. After a long (lonnngggg) love/ hate relationship with the pill, which usually made me throw up or bleed constantly (yes, even the Nuvaring and progesterone-only didn't work out for me, I've tried it all!), I decided it was best for me to get a Paraguard IUD. I was immediately attracted to the idea of hormone-free contraception after my ordeal and my aversion to increasing my chances of getting cancer. So, 5 days ago I got it and although it was easily one of the most painful experiences of my life (not to scare you away from the idea, maybe I'm a bit dramatic), but I have no regrets yet. But it was only extremely painful when they measured my uterus, which the Dr. had to do twice because I was a baby and jolted. Thank god that only lasted like 30 seconds. The rest though, wasn't so bad. I felt a little dizzy after but nothing else too bad except for moderate cramping that's gotten a little better since then. My dr. had prescribed me something to dilate my cervix initially, and due to some mix ups, I wasn't able to take it for the procedure but luckily, she gave me valium. If I can offer some advice, check with your doctor and see if they can provide you something to dilate your cervix, I think it would have helped me a lot. Oh, and a little Valium never hurts, either!

2014-03-25 22:49:20 UTC

Sarah F.

I'm 21, and have never been pregnant. After a long (lonnngggg) love/ hate relationship with the pill, which usually made me throw up or bleed constantly (yes, even the Nuvaring and progesterone-only didn't work out for me, I've tried it all!), I decided it was best for me to get a Paraguard IUD. I was immediately attracted to the idea of hormone-free contraception after my ordeal and my aversion to increasing my chances of getting cancer. So, 5 days ago I got it and although it was easily one of the most painful experiences of my life (not to scare you away from the idea, maybe I'm a bit dramatic), but I have no regrets yet. But it was only extremely painful when they measured my uterus, which the Dr. had to do twice because I was a baby and jolted. Thank god that only lasted like 30 seconds. The rest though, wasn't so bad. I felt a little dizzy after but nothing else too bad except for moderate cramping that's gotten a little better since then. My dr. had prescribed me something to dilate my cervix initially, and due to some mix ups, I wasn't able to take it for the procedure but luckily, she gave me valium. If I can offer some advice, check with your doctor and see if they can provide you something to dilate your cervix, I think it would have helped me a lot. Oh, and a little Valium never hurts, either!

2014-03-25 22:49:20 UTC

Sarah F.

I'm 21, and have never been pregnant. After a long (lonnngggg) love/ hate relationship with the pill, which usually made me throw up or bleed constantly (yes, even the Nuvaring and progesterone-only didn't work out for me, I've tried it all!), I decided it was best for me to get a Paraguard IUD. I was immediately attracted to the idea of hormone-free contraception after my ordeal and my aversion to increasing my chances of getting cancer. So, 5 days ago I got it and although it was easily one of the most painful experiences of my life (not to scare you away from the idea, maybe I'm a bit dramatic), but I have no regrets yet. But it was only extremely painful when they measured my uterus, which the Dr. had to do twice because I was a baby and jolted. Thank god that only lasted like 30 seconds. The rest though, wasn't so bad. I felt a little dizzy after but nothing else too bad except for moderate cramping that's gotten a little better since then. My dr. had prescribed me something to dilate my cervix initially, and due to some mix ups, I wasn't able to take it for the procedure but luckily, she gave me valium. If I can offer some advice, check with your doctor and see if they can provide you something to dilate your cervix, I think it would have helped me a lot. Oh, and a little Valium never hurts, either!

2014-03-25 22:49:20 UTC

Sarah F.

I'm 21, and have never been pregnant. After a long (lonnngggg) love/ hate relationship with the pill, which usually made me throw up or bleed constantly (yes, even the Nuvaring and progesterone-only didn't work out for me, I've tried it all!), I decided it was best for me to get a Paraguard IUD. I was immediately attracted to the idea of hormone-free contraception after my ordeal and my aversion to increasing my chances of getting cancer. So, 5 days ago I got it and although it was easily one of the most painful experiences of my life (not to scare you away from the idea, maybe I'm a bit dramatic), but I have no regrets yet. But it was only extremely painful when they measured my uterus, which the Dr. had to do twice because I was a baby and jolted. Thank god that only lasted like 30 seconds. The rest though, wasn't so bad. I felt a little dizzy after but nothing else too bad except for moderate cramping that's gotten a little better since then. My dr. had prescribed me something to dilate my cervix initially, and due to some mix ups, I wasn't able to take it for the procedure but luckily, she gave me valium. If I can offer some advice, check with your doctor and see if they can provide you something to dilate your cervix, I think it would have helped me a lot. Oh, and a little Valium never hurts, either!

2014-03-25 22:49:20 UTC

Sarah F.

Hi Esis! A change in bleeding and string length are both things that can really only be evaluated in person. It's common for there to be ups and downs with bleeding, and it's hard to judge string length by feeling, so it's a good idea to call your provider to sort out what's going on.

2014-03-31 21:05:18 UTC

Colleen Krajewski, MD, MPH

Thanks for your question! It's often hard to feel a string, and that's the point! It becomes soft and tucked behind your cervix, so it can't be felt during intercourse either. This is something to address in person with your provider at your follow up visit.

2014-03-31 21:07:08 UTC

Colleen Krajewski, MD, MPH

I had the mirena inserted today and it was the worst pain of my life. She kept telling me to sit still, and even though I have an incredible pain tolerance, it took everything in me to stop myself from pulling away from her. She had to stop several times because my body involuntarily was crawling away from her on the table. I had no numbing or medicine to relive the pain. And it was a severed cramping / stabbing. When I left the office my legs felt so numb and in pain like I couldn't move. I have been laying in bed all day and for the first two hours could not stop crying out. I was not expecting this what so ever. It went the same way as "Sarah bear" said, but the pain was 10/10 pure agony. She almost Has to stop because I could not stand it. It's been over 18 hours and is still horrible cramping and hurts to change positions or bend over.

2014-04-10 08:26:02 UTC

Aimee

Just and mine inserted today. Did anyone have trouble with their vagina muscles not contracting? There's dried blood from the procedure in there and I tried to reach in there in the shower to clean myself but I couldn't get in there. Too tight for anything to get in there. Will see if it's opened up in the morning but just wondering if this happened to anyone else? Thanks so much

2014-04-11 03:46:30 UTC

Coos

I had the mirena inserted today and it was the worst pain of my life. She kept telling me to sit still, and even though I have an incredible pain tolerance, it took everything in me to stop myself from pulling away from her. She had to stop several times because my body involuntarily was crawling away from her on the table. I had no numbing or medicine to relive the pain. And it was a severed cramping / stabbing. When I left the office my legs felt so numb and in pain like I couldn't move. I have been laying in bed all day and for the first two hours could not stop crying out. I was not expecting this what so ever. It went the same way as "Sarah bear" said, but the pain was 10/10 pure agony. She almost Has to stop because I could not stand it. It's been over 18 hours and is still horrible cramping and hurts to change positions or bend over.

2014-04-10 08:26:02 UTC

Aimee

Just and mine inserted today. Did anyone have trouble with their vagina muscles not contracting? There's dried blood from the procedure in there and I tried to reach in there in the shower to clean myself but I couldn't get in there. Too tight for anything to get in there. Will see if it's opened up in the morning but just wondering if this happened to anyone else? Thanks so much

2014-04-11 03:46:30 UTC

Coos

Just and mine inserted today. Did anyone have trouble with their vagina muscles not contracting? There's dried blood from the procedure in there and I tried to reach in there in the shower to clean myself but I couldn't get in there. Too tight for anything to get in there. Will see if it's opened up in the morning but just wondering if this happened to anyone else? Thanks so much

2014-04-11 03:46:30 UTC

Coos

Got my Mirena yesterday....never had any babies. I was on the Hippo-Provera shot for 4 years. So I'll tell you, I have had 5 tattoos, a broken jaw, wisdom teeth out at 38, broken nose 3 times and honestly, I'd take any of those over the insertion. Worst. Pain. Of. My. Life. I don't regret doing it by any means, but they should have told me the truth. "Mild discomfort" didn't even come close to covering the horrifying pain that I experienced. Then, going on to feeling like I was going to pass out/and or vomit for the next 10 minutes, and the worst menstrual cramps of my life for the next 24 hours. I feel better now. I took 600 mG of Ibuprofen (joke) beforehand and another 600 this AM. I used a heating pad last night to help me sleep. Still some minor pain and pinching. Wow...just wow. I'd also like to disclose that I am a Diva, but I'm no crybaby. I have a high tolerance for pain...I'm no whimp. I can tell you that if I say it sucked, it sucked BIG TIME. I assume the "no babies" thing is huge for the pain. My cervix has never seen the light of day, and I think that had a big part to do with my pain. Now, if this will help me lose the 40lbs I gained on Depo, I will take that pain any day!

2014-04-16 12:50:58 UTC

Heather Gingher

my got stabbed all the time by the iud so that isn't a myth and I have had it in twice.

2014-04-21 05:10:18 UTC

Mandy

my got stabbed all the time by the iud so that isn't a myth and I have had it in twice.

2014-04-21 05:10:18 UTC

Mandy

When I got my inserted, I actually fainted. After that it was 2 months of heavy bleeding and cramps. But now I don't even get a period!!!

2014-04-23 06:47:55 UTC

Kimberly N

When I got my inserted, I actually fainted. After that it was 2 months of heavy bleeding and cramps. But now I don't even get a period!!!

2014-04-23 06:47:55 UTC

Kimberly N

I'll be getting mine removed on April 30, 2014. I've had it since December 26, 2013. The process of getting it in wasn't bad at all, however I also had a baby in April of 2013 as well, so I've heard it helps. It took 2 1/2 months to stop bleeding after it was inserted. It was like being post-partum again. This last week and a half I started having lower pelvic pain and lower abdominal pain. I also began having heart arrhythmia (began a couple months ago), rage, and off cycle periods. I've seen a cardiologist, my OB/GYN, my regular doctor, and my nurse practitioner. I had an ultrasound this week to make sure the Mirena is in place. My OB/GYN called to say that the IUD is in perfect position and isn't embedded whatsoever. I'm used to pain, I mean, I had a baby naturally for god's sake, but the pain associated with this IUD is one like no other. It's not super painful for me unless I'm sitting for 20-30 minutes straight. The more forums I research and the more women who state they have a tilted uterus is starting to make me question IUDs for women with this tilt. It's internally painful and it feels like my body knows it's a foreign object. If I have a full bladder, or any type of internal pressure, it'll effect the way my IUD feels. I love the idea of the IUD, and I'm disappointed it didn't work out for me because I just got through all of the bleeding! The IUD is definitely awesome for some, but it's not for everyone. Also, your partner may (probably will) feel the strings the first few times you have sex. It's simply because the strings have to soften over time and then slowly curve under. The only red flag I had with deciding on Mirena was when reading through the pamphlet given by my doctor made by Mirena it literally said, "It is not known exactly how Mirena works." It looks like they have a website that is now updated with facts instead of theories, so that's hopeful. Either way, I'm not completely for Mirena and I'm certainly not fully against it. I just wish it would have worked for my tilted uterus.

2014-04-25 15:23:48 UTC

Morgan Overton

Hi, sorry i dont mean to come in here and shut down your article but I would seriously not recomend the IUD and i think it should be banned. Girlfriend got it once and it was extremly dicomforting, if i went too deep felt like something sharp poking my penis. and I wasnt about to take another chance n have them try n "replace it". They are going by averages but not everyone is average, its not ok! lol unless u wanna try n shove it up even further. anyway like someone said earlier, the poking is not a myth

2014-04-28 03:58:33 UTC

genji

Hi, sorry i dont mean to come in here and shut down your article but I would seriously not recomend the IUD and i think it should be banned. Girlfriend got it once and it was extremly dicomforting, if i went too deep felt like something sharp poking my penis. and I wasnt about to take another chance n have them try n "replace it". They are going by averages but not everyone is average, its not ok! lol unless u wanna try n shove it up even further. anyway like someone said earlier, the poking is not a myth

2014-04-28 03:58:33 UTC

genji

Hi, sorry i dont mean to come in here and shut down your article but I would seriously not recomend the IUD and i think it should be banned. Girlfriend got it once and it was extremly dicomforting, if i went too deep felt like something sharp poking my penis. and I wasnt about to take another chance n have them try n "replace it". They are going by averages but not everyone is average, its not ok! lol unless u wanna try n shove it up even further. anyway like someone said earlier, the poking is not a myth

2014-04-28 03:58:33 UTC

genji

Hi, sorry i dont mean to come in here and shut down your article but I would seriously not recomend the IUD and i think it should be banned. Girlfriend got it once and it was extremly dicomforting, if i went too deep felt like something sharp poking my penis. and I wasnt about to take another chance n have them try n "replace it". They are going by averages but not everyone is average, its not ok! lol unless u wanna try n shove it up even further. anyway like someone said earlier, the poking is not a myth

2014-04-28 03:58:33 UTC

genji

Hi, sorry i dont mean to come in here and shut down your article but I would seriously not recomend the IUD and i think it should be banned. Girlfriend got it once and it was extremly dicomforting, if i went too deep felt like something sharp poking my penis. and I wasnt about to take another chance n have them try n "replace it". They are going by averages but not everyone is average, its not ok! lol unless u wanna try n shove it up even further. anyway like someone said earlier, the poking is not a myth

2014-04-28 03:58:33 UTC

genji

Hi, sorry i dont mean to come in here and shut down your article but I would seriously not recomend the IUD and i think it should be banned. Girlfriend got it once and it was extremly dicomforting, if i went too deep felt like something sharp poking my penis. and I wasnt about to take another chance n have them try n "replace it". They are going by averages but not everyone is average, its not ok! lol unless u wanna try n shove it up even further. anyway like someone said earlier, the poking is not a myth

2014-04-28 03:58:33 UTC

genji

Hi, sorry i dont mean to come in here and shut down your article but I would seriously not recomend the IUD and i think it should be banned. Girlfriend got it once and it was extremly dicomforting, if i went too deep felt like something sharp poking my penis. and I wasnt about to take another chance n have them try n "replace it". They are going by averages but not everyone is average, its not ok! lol unless u wanna try n shove it up even further. anyway like someone said earlier, the poking is not a myth

2014-04-28 03:58:33 UTC

genji

Hi, sorry i dont mean to come in here and shut down your article but I would seriously not recomend the IUD and i think it should be banned. Girlfriend got it once and it was extremly dicomforting, if i went too deep felt like something sharp poking my penis. and I wasnt about to take another chance n have them try n "replace it". They are going by averages but not everyone is average, its not ok! lol unless u wanna try n shove it up even further. anyway like someone said earlier, the poking is not a myth

2014-04-28 03:58:33 UTC

genji

Hi, sorry i dont mean to come in here and shut down your article but I would seriously not recomend the IUD and i think it should be banned. Girlfriend got it once and it was extremly dicomforting, if i went too deep felt like something sharp poking my penis. and I wasnt about to take another chance n have them try n "replace it". They are going by averages but not everyone is average, its not ok! lol unless u wanna try n shove it up even further. anyway like someone said earlier, the poking is not a myth

2014-04-28 03:58:33 UTC

genji

Hi, sorry i dont mean to come in here and shut down your article but I would seriously not recomend the IUD and i think it should be banned. Girlfriend got it once and it was extremly dicomforting, if i went too deep felt like something sharp poking my penis. and I wasnt about to take another chance n have them try n "replace it". They are going by averages but not everyone is average, its not ok! lol unless u wanna try n shove it up even further. anyway like someone said earlier, the poking is not a myth

2014-04-28 03:58:33 UTC

genji

Hi, sorry i dont mean to come in here and shut down your article but I would seriously not recomend the IUD and i think it should be banned. Girlfriend got it once and it was extremly dicomforting, if i went too deep felt like something sharp poking my penis. and I wasnt about to take another chance n have them try n "replace it". They are going by averages but not everyone is average, its not ok! lol unless u wanna try n shove it up even further. anyway like someone said earlier, the poking is not a myth

2014-04-28 03:58:33 UTC

genji

I was so nervous about the insertion that my obgyn prescribed me tylenol with codeine for before and after the procedure. My hands were sweaty as could be and I was so tense that the nurse had to tell me to calm down and relax. The actual insertion wasnt that bad. The cramps after, however, were the horror. I could feel when the codeine was wearing off. I have painful menstruation but never like that. Those were 2 horrible days. And the cramps started minutes after. I've got to admit though, that I felt so empowered to have gone through the procedure. I felt strong and proud of myself. I am 23 and no children so I was super worried about the pain but it was bearable. Worth it for 5yrs of coverage.

2014-04-30 06:26:56 UTC

AnaG

not just that you can feel it but its painful and prevents further penetration and i think as you can see there are lots of other reasons not to its dangerous for females more if not done correctly. I just see it as too risky without good results vs something like the pill. and yall can thumb me down for this last part i dont care but i think the pull out method works well. The whole "accidents or pre cum" that they talk about is not really clear i mean if you bust inside your gonna have a baby there is no secret equation, in "the heat of the moment" is nonsense you know what your doing.

2014-05-08 02:53:04 UTC

genji

I am not lying when I tell you mine didn't hurt, like at all.

2014-05-09 05:10:31 UTC

Emily S.

I am not lying when I tell you mine didn't hurt, like at all.

2014-05-09 05:10:31 UTC

Emily S.

I have just had my coil put in about 1 week ago friday just gone i am 16 my string have dropped like so i can see them and also when i sit down it feels like i have a tampax in ita like i have but it in wrong you know what a mean i just wanted to know if this is what is ment to happed becauae i dont want to ask a doc because i am still bleeding and its not like i want them to touch when i am bleeding help please?//

2014-05-11 21:56:13 UTC

abbie

I had the Iud for four years. I have had 2 kids so my cervix has been opened. Insertion was Painful! And the pain continued for a week straight. I had bleeding and cramps off and on for the first 6 months. After that I was good for about a year. Then the side effects started At 2.5 years: Weight gain, the inability to lose it, no energy, mood swings, foggy brain, boil-like acne on the jaw, hair loss. But I put up with it because i was told the iud was still technically working And it was good for another couple years. But the year 4 rolled around and the strings went missing. Iud had moved and the strings were to short. Apparently that can happen the longer you have it in (which no one told me) After ultrasounds, blood work and two painful attempts to remove it manually I had to have surgery with general anaesthesia to get it out. I am 3 days post op and i am starting to heal.So just to put it out there its not all great and wonderful. There are serious risks and side affects that women need to consider that doctors dont mention. Im not saying this will happen to everyone but this was my experiance.

2014-05-25 17:06:22 UTC

LR

Had to share my experience. I'm a mother of two boys. One is a teen and the other is a pre-teen. My hubby and I have always practiced the pull-out method, but finally had a scare a few months ago. There's no way I want to start over with kids. So, I decided to get Mirena so that we can have MORE fun stress free. Today is my two week anniversary with Mirena. Insertion was so much easier than all the reviews I have read. I had it inserted on the first day of my period. Only felt minor discomfort. Nothing unbearable. My period continued and was heavy for about three-four days and I then spotted for about 4 days after that. I haven't spotted at all for the past five or so days. Feeling fine. I'm anxious to find out what my next period is going to be like!

2014-06-18 20:37:50 UTC

Meldanell

Had to share my experience. I'm a mother of two boys. One is a teen and the other is a pre-teen. My hubby and I have always practiced the pull-out method, but finally had a scare a few months ago. There's no way I want to start over with kids. So, I decided to get Mirena so that we can have MORE fun stress free. Today is my two week anniversary with Mirena. Insertion was so much easier than all the reviews I have read. I had it inserted on the first day of my period. Only felt minor discomfort. Nothing unbearable. My period continued and was heavy for about three-four days and I then spotted for about 4 days after that. I haven't spotted at all for the past five or so days. Feeling fine. I'm anxious to find out what my next period is going to be like!

2014-06-18 20:37:50 UTC

Meldanell

what happens if i have heavy bleeding after a week that my mirena was inserted?

2014-06-21 11:19:28 UTC

Cindy

I'm glad that you all found this helpful. I've now had it for 5.5 months and everything at this point is going well. If you're bleeding in a way that makes you uncomfortable, see your doctor. If you have a funny stink, it's probably BV, which is not VD, but you sill have to see your doctor. Basically, websites like this should be used to inform your decision to get or not get Mirena and the the like, but while I'm brilliant in every way, I'm not a doctor. Get thee to one if you're having symptoms that are outside of the norm. Best, Sarah

2014-06-22 15:51:24 UTC

SarahBear

Ha, I'm glad that you enjoyed it. I, like you, have found that vaginas and libraries don't mix well.

2014-06-22 15:52:16 UTC

SarahBear

Probably nothing. Everything about your crotch is a little different now, but if you're worried, see your doc.

2014-06-22 15:52:54 UTC

SarahBear

MIne was very painfull. Like the worst strongest contration you would feel during child birth. I Thought I was going to pass out. and that was 3 weeks ago, and I am still having some very strong agonizing cramps.

2014-06-30 21:39:14 UTC

lillyfish

Hello Esis! The paragard is safe to use together with the Diva Cup. If you're worried that you're having one of the rare complications of the IUD, you should talk to your provider.

2014-07-01 23:14:31 UTC

Colleen Krajewski, MD, MPH

Hello Esis! The paragard is safe to use together with the Diva Cup. If you're worried that you're having one of the rare complications of the IUD, you should talk to your provider.

2014-07-01 23:14:31 UTC

Colleen Krajewski, MD, MPH

I do not recomend the marina iud. I got my iud 4years ago. It didn't hurt one bit during insertion and I got up and walked right away! No pain, no cramps, and no blood. For 2years it was great but then I got a random period. My husband was always able to feel it , he said it was a sharp pain but we would just switch positions and it would be fine. But after I got my random period he could no longer feel it and neither could I. So I scheduled a dr apt and he couldn't find the strings, sonogram was scheduled and it was in the right spot but the strings had coiled up. He said I could leave it. A month ago I had another random period so I made another apt. The dr and nurse said it wasn't uncomon that I had got a period, I said so once a year is normal? So he took a look. I got it removed today the dr couldn't find the strings which didn't surprise me. He even thought he was going to have to scope me to find my iud. After 15min of the worst pain ever he found it and got it out. I even cried it was so painful and I have been through child birth with no crying or screaming. He said it was a good thing I listened to my body and not the other 2 doctors I had been too, because my iud was upside down and was in a horrible place!

2014-07-11 06:12:24 UTC

april

I do not recomend the marina iud. I got my iud 4years ago. It didn't hurt one bit during insertion and I got up and walked right away! No pain, no cramps, and no blood. For 2years it was great but then I got a random period. My husband was always able to feel it , he said it was a sharp pain but we would just switch positions and it would be fine. But after I got my random period he could no longer feel it and neither could I. So I scheduled a dr apt and he couldn't find the strings, sonogram was scheduled and it was in the right spot but the strings had coiled up. He said I could leave it. A month ago I had another random period so I made another apt. The dr and nurse said it wasn't uncomon that I had got a period, I said so once a year is normal? So he took a look. I got it removed today the dr couldn't find the strings which didn't surprise me. He even thought he was going to have to scope me to find my iud. After 15min of the worst pain ever he found it and got it out. I even cried it was so painful and I have been through child birth with no crying or screaming. He said it was a good thing I listened to my body and not the other 2 doctors I had been too, because my iud was upside down and was in a horrible place!

2014-07-11 06:12:24 UTC

april

I just had my mirena inserted today. I deliberately didn't read threads like this so I wouldn't be scared but dang...I have birthed three kids and the pain I had during insertion was akin to labor pains during the last leg of labor without anesthesia. I have had some pretty nasty cramping this afternoon and evening, worse than normal period pain. I am on day 3 of my period so I thought this process would be easier. ..apparently not for me. During the 'sound' of my uterus I swear I felt like it was on fire and the pain radiated down my right leg...I felt like I was having labor pain and giving birth to a fireball! After the doc asked how I was and I told him about the burning sensation he was a bit puzzled. But maybe that was how my body dealt with this "violation" lol... I am excited to think I won't have to worry about a pill or ring for 5 years! I just hope these cramps don't last too long. I have lots to do before school starts in 2.5 weeks!

2014-07-12 02:56:50 UTC

Sharon Stratton Burchett

I just had my mirena inserted today. I deliberately didn't read threads like this so I wouldn't be scared but dang...I have birthed three kids and the pain I had during insertion was akin to labor pains during the last leg of labor without anesthesia. I have had some pretty nasty cramping this afternoon and evening, worse than normal period pain. I am on day 3 of my period so I thought this process would be easier. ..apparently not for me. During the 'sound' of my uterus I swear I felt like it was on fire and the pain radiated down my right leg...I felt like I was having labor pain and giving birth to a fireball! After the doc asked how I was and I told him about the burning sensation he was a bit puzzled. But maybe that was how my body dealt with this "violation" lol... I am excited to think I won't have to worry about a pill or ring for 5 years! I just hope these cramps don't last too long. I have lots to do before school starts in 2.5 weeks!

2014-07-12 02:56:50 UTC

Sharon Stratton Burchett

I had my IUD inserted about 2 weeks ago and so far I LOVE it! The insertion was nothing like the horror stories I have read. I am 23 and have no kids, my doctor did numb my cervix which made me pretty dizzy(honestly that was the worst part). Afterword I felt like I was having cramps while on my cycle they lasted for about 3 days but were dull. Maybe I just got really lucky and had a great doctor but I had no pain.

2014-07-27 05:54:59 UTC

marissa

I had my IUD inserted about 2 weeks ago and so far I LOVE it! The insertion was nothing like the horror stories I have read. I am 23 and have no kids, my doctor did numb my cervix which made me pretty dizzy(honestly that was the worst part). Afterword I felt like I was having cramps while on my cycle they lasted for about 3 days but were dull. Maybe I just got really lucky and had a great doctor but I had no pain.

2014-07-27 05:54:59 UTC

marissa

This needs an updated post! I got the Paraguard. I was so anxious the day before leading up to the day of, which only made things worst! Stop reading every horror story and think it's going to happen to you (as I did!). The entire procedure took about 5 minutes and for me, it was not bad at all. Minimal cramps during the sounding, and nothing but pressure during the insertion. I had an excellent staff inserting and distracting me so that helped a lot. I took 800mg of motrin at 8pm the night before and 800mg of motrin at 630am the day of with the insertion taking place around 930am. The whole appeal to me was no hormones. I have been on birth control for years now and have gained weight and experienced headaches like no other during that time. I almost talked myself out of this and I would have been so disappointed. I now have 10 years of pill free birth control. I did experience some cramping the night of, but a heating pad and more motrin mixed with tylenol helped a lot. But seriously, nothing bad at all. I would relate this to being a better experience than a pap! Good luck, and don't overthink it! It is totally worth it.

2014-08-02 00:39:00 UTC

jessica cook

i agree, my mirena insertion was uncomfortable, but hardly worth putting into the "screaming in agony" category. in 7-10 seconds it was in and life was good. for the rest of the day, i did experience some light cramping, but nothing severe. HOWEVER, i will say that my mirena has brought on ovarian cysts like crazy. before mirena, i never had any type of cysts, and then i had one form (and burst) about 8 months after insertion. worst pain i think i've experienced. anyway, so now about every other month, i get these spells which last about a day. constant, severe cramping that is only alleviated when i lie down (experiencing them today, actually). my doctor says it's most likely my "period" or ovulation and doesn't seem to be worried. it's a big pain in the butt, though...so much that i've considered having the mirena removed because of it. but then i think about a life of no pads/tampons/babies and i change my mind.

2014-08-04 06:28:50 UTC

Sara

i agree, my mirena insertion was uncomfortable, but hardly worth putting into the "screaming in agony" category. in 7-10 seconds it was in and life was good. for the rest of the day, i did experience some light cramping, but nothing severe. HOWEVER, i will say that my mirena has brought on ovarian cysts like crazy. before mirena, i never had any type of cysts, and then i had one form (and burst) about 8 months after insertion. worst pain i think i've experienced. anyway, so now about every other month, i get these spells which last about a day. constant, severe cramping that is only alleviated when i lie down (experiencing them today, actually). my doctor says it's most likely my "period" or ovulation and doesn't seem to be worried. it's a big pain in the butt, though...so much that i've considered having the mirena removed because of it. but then i think about a life of no pads/tampons/babies and i change my mind.

2014-08-04 06:28:50 UTC

Sara

My girlfriend has one and it does hurt me, quite a lot. She's had it checked and has been told everything is normal. It makes it very unpleasant for me, but having it up on q forum, that it categorically will not hurt your partner doesn't help much either, because she won't understand how much it hurts me if you've got it on here as a myth. Maybe get your facts straight??

2014-08-05 22:12:45 UTC

Raphael Rodriguez

Ok the insertion and measuring hurt like he'll cramps for 2 days I never had a cramp in my life I am married with 2 older kids on the pill 29 yrs only off because of high blood pressure

2014-08-16 02:48:11 UTC

kim

I had my IUD inserted yesterday, AFTER reading this comment thread. It is NO WHERE nearly as painful (or at least, it wasn't for me) as many commenters suggest. It felt like cramps mixed with getting a Pap done. My gyno used a ton of numbing spray, which I would highly recommend!! Before the appointment, I took 4 200mg Advil and .5mg Lorazepam (because I was anxious I would be the 1% who gets it lodged in their rectal wall). I came home, rested most of the afternoon, and only really experienced cramping when I got up to walk around--nothing that another 800mg of Advil didn't help. Will hopefully be able to go without meds for today! I had some spotting after, but that's about it. FYI--I am 24, never had kids. It's recommended that you go while you're on your period, but they didn't have any appointments open so I wasn't.

2014-08-16 11:33:59 UTC

Anne

Everyone please look up experiences of couples who have been living with an IUD. Many women and male partners have reported much discomfort for the male partner.

2014-09-02 13:33:39 UTC

NJ Momma

Im sorry to say that #5 is not a myth. My girlfriend just got a Manara (Maybe Mirina?) a few weeks ago and we have had terrible sex ever since. After reading forums and talking to her doctor on the phone, she went back in to have it checked. There was no expelling, but one of the strings was indeed pointed directly outward and needed to be adjusted. The doctor slightly trimmed the strings and coiled them into what she said was the perfect position. Since then we have attempted sex 4 or five times. At least 3 of those times ended with me yelping in pain. I have no delusions about my size, but I am not particularly small. In most positions I can feel the cervix during sex and even when the strings weren't directly stabbing me, I could at least feel them from the side and also could feel the hard base of the IUD where the strings attach. Additionally, the fear of an imminent attack of the cervix lance is distracting to say the least. What I dont understand is how biological engineers or anyone else would think this would work. I know it does work for some people, but metal and/or plastic wires in the most sensitive area of two peoples bodies seems like a terrible idea. I wouldn't put fishing wire inside the engine of my car. It would destroy it... and its made of steel. We plan to try another doctor to see if our first one had been doing it wrong, but if we get the same answers as before, the thing will probably be coming out. Its a big disappointment for both of us because my girlfriend was really looking forward to the benefits and not having to take the pill.... Bummer. Maybe its so effective because it destroys the mans will to have sex...?

2014-09-09 03:36:18 UTC

CSG

I just had my IUD (ParaGard) inserted today. My doc was extremely pragmatic, and got the whole shebang done in less than 20 minutes. I've been on birth control since I was 16, but am wary of using hormones for an additional 10 years (I'm a week shy of my 25th birthday). So I went with the copper IUD. The insertion process was considerably worse than a colposcopy, which I've never enjoyed, but I handled it. My biggest is takeaway is that you shouldn't plan to drive or walk to public transportation alone after the procedure. I left the office within 10 minutes of the insertion, by myself, which was a bad plan, as was my decision to rely on a 30 minute metro ride plus 15 minutes of walking to get home (this is why boyfriends/husbands/partners/BFFs were invented). Despite my complaints, and my embarrassing half-hour side trip to a GWU bathroom, I'm pleased with my decision. After all, there is no way that an IUD is worse than labor or an abortion. For longterm birth control, this is the best option on the market.

2014-09-17 01:39:16 UTC

Emily Reigart

Hey guys! I just got the Mirena IUD yesterday and I'm experiencing cramping and I was wondering how long after insertion the cramping should last for?? If anyone can please help that would be great because I am a huge hypochondriac and I took two Aleve an hour ago and it didn't really help.

2014-09-17 17:09:31 UTC

Marisa Arviso

I got the Mirena on the 11th of this month. I choose this option because it was the easiest for me and it could last for 5 years. My doctor went over what was going to happen, he told me about pain. He told me the pro's and con's. The second to worst part was when they got me ready for it. I'm very tender down there so it takes a lot for me to just stick something up my vagina. That clamp hurt so much and everything about getting the Mirena in was painful. After the pain wasn't that bad. It went away and I was ok.The worst part for me is right now. I'm on my period and it is a living hell. I had to go to the hospital yesterday because of how much pain I was in. The doctor who saw me basically told me that everything was fine after she did a Pelvic Exam. She did say that I will have pain since my body is getting to know this device in me. But like I said the pain that I'm having on my period is bad. I'm bleeding more, I'm having back pain, I'm having way then enough cramps. I only have cramps for one day yet with this I'm on my 4th day of cramps.I'm thinking about taking it out. I can't handle this much pain every time I get my period. This is beyond what the doctor told me.

2014-09-18 19:48:56 UTC

Jasmine

Yes, im a guy - and the string does in fact poke u. This is no myth.

2014-10-27 12:03:09 UTC

floozietuesday

That shouldn't happen since it's behiond the cirvux and the poenis shouldn't go past the cirvix, but I suppsoie it could eb the string cauising the pain/discomfort or even some other reaction. Unless your penis is going past the cirvix, but then I would be worried about the cirvix. Regardless of the cause, it is an issue.

2014-10-30 06:48:22 UTC

ErynnSilver

omg SarahBear that was the funniest description i've ever read, i had the skyla inserted over a month ago and i'm telling you that was the exact description of the insertion process, so accurate i love ur post lmao

2014-11-11 20:31:51 UTC

Katie S.

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

In response to that last bit, those strings are actually really bothersome for me. It might not be a problem for some guys, but for those of us with longer "reach", it hurts.

2014-11-21 05:33:21 UTC

Ben Byerly

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

As a med student, allow me to say thank you for the contribution to our learning :)

2014-11-23 13:13:55 UTC

Alyssa GB

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I have had an I.U.D. (without hormones) for three years and I am very happy with it. My periods are not more painful, maybe a little heavier but nothing too terrible. I have no kids, even so, Insertion was painful for for a mere minute and again, not excruciating pain, tolerable momentary pain. I used no pain killers I did have it inserted while I was on my period, perhaps that made it a more tolerable experience than others here claim to have had. (I also had this procedure done in Germany, does that make it different?) I took the day off work afterwards and I did have cramping for maybe 48hrs after the event, again nothing too too horrible. I have two comments about this otherwise great article. Firstly, my husband can indeed fell the "string" of the i.u.d. during sex. And I have had it checked for correct positioning twice. He cannot feel it every time and I think only once in all these years has it "bothered", or distracted him from his "goal"... but he can indeed feel it now and then. Secondly, the line "... compared with women who used other types of birth control" struck me rather.... that means that using birth control in general raises the risk of infertility and pelvic infection, yes? Therefore, having an I.U.D. as opposed to NOT having one DOES raise the risk of such things.... Let's all just conveniently gloss over that fact, shall we?

2014-12-04 11:59:46 UTC

Breezy Teschendorf

I just got my mirena yesterday. As a result too reading all these reviews, i was shaking like crazy when i went in there. So before i went, i took 600 mg of ibprofen, 50 mg of tramadol & 10 mg of baclofen. I was pretty scared & i didnt want to feel anything. (mind you guys, i dont have any kids & im 18) When i got there the nurse also gave me 800mg of ibprofen. So i had taken a lot of medicine. My gyn understood & said i was okay, i just shouldnt take any more ibprofen for the rest of the day. Anyways to the point. Took off the pants, got on the table & covered myelf with a sheet. The nurse was really nice & she let me squeze her hand & kept my mind off of it. So basically the gyn went in there, put in a speculum, cleaned around a bit & gave me a local anesthetic to numb the area. After she gave me the shot, i thought i was going deaf. But i was so busy talking to the nurse, i barely felt any type of pain with insertion. The gyn said that it normall takes 7 minutes, but mines took 20 because my cervix is shaped weird. But i was shocked by how well i felt. The nurse took my blood pressure every 5 minutes & then they told me i was good to go. I was really sleepy so i slept the whole way home & when i got home i went to sleep & when i woke up, it was really bad. The cramps were so awful. I could barely move & i couldnt take anymore medicine to kind of silence the cramps. All i could do was lie there with a heating pad, in pain. At about 3:00 i took another ibprofen & i was able to sleep. Now its morning & i feel pretty good. The cramps were pretty bad but i got through them. Insertion was not anywhere near as bad as i thought it was gonna be from reading these post, my insertion was quite painless & i dont have ANY KIDS. It all depends on your body. Dont believe that what happened to other people will happen to you, because they arent you!

2014-12-17 14:31:06 UTC

Queen Manni

I just got my mirena yesterday. As a result too reading all these reviews, i was shaking like crazy when i went in there. So before i went, i took 600 mg of ibprofen, 50 mg of tramadol & 10 mg of baclofen. I was pretty scared & i didnt want to feel anything. (mind you guys, i dont have any kids & im 18) When i got there the nurse also gave me 800mg of ibprofen. So i had taken a lot of medicine. My gyn understood & said i was okay, i just shouldnt take any more ibprofen for the rest of the day. Anyways to the point. Took off the pants, got on the table & covered myelf with a sheet. The nurse was really nice & she let me squeze her hand & kept my mind off of it. So basically the gyn went in there, put in a speculum, cleaned around a bit & gave me a local anesthetic to numb the area. After she gave me the shot, i thought i was going deaf. But i was so busy talking to the nurse, i barely felt any type of pain with insertion. The gyn said that it normall takes 7 minutes, but mines took 20 because my cervix is shaped weird. But i was shocked by how well i felt. The nurse took my blood pressure every 5 minutes & then they told me i was good to go. I was really sleepy so i slept the whole way home & when i got home i went to sleep & when i woke up, it was really bad. The cramps were so awful. I could barely move & i couldnt take anymore medicine to kind of silence the cramps. All i could do was lie there with a heating pad, in pain. At about 3:00 i took another ibprofen & i was able to sleep. Now its morning & i feel pretty good. The cramps were pretty bad but i got through them. Insertion was not anywhere near as bad as i thought it was gonna be from reading these post, my insertion was quite painless & i dont have ANY KIDS. It all depends on your body. Dont believe that what happened to other people will happen to you, because they arent you!

2014-12-17 14:31:06 UTC

Queen Manni

I just got my mirena yesterday. As a result too reading all these reviews, i was shaking like crazy when i went in there. So before i went, i took 600 mg of ibprofen, 50 mg of tramadol & 10 mg of baclofen. I was pretty scared & i didnt want to feel anything. (mind you guys, i dont have any kids & im 18) When i got there the nurse also gave me 800mg of ibprofen. So i had taken a lot of medicine. My gyn understood & said i was okay, i just shouldnt take any more ibprofen for the rest of the day. Anyways to the point. Took off the pants, got on the table & covered myelf with a sheet. The nurse was really nice & she let me squeze her hand & kept my mind off of it. So basically the gyn went in there, put in a speculum, cleaned around a bit & gave me a local anesthetic to numb the area. After she gave me the shot, i thought i was going deaf. But i was so busy talking to the nurse, i barely felt any type of pain with insertion. The gyn said that it normall takes 7 minutes, but mines took 20 because my cervix is shaped weird. But i was shocked by how well i felt. The nurse took my blood pressure every 5 minutes & then they told me i was good to go. I was really sleepy so i slept the whole way home & when i got home i went to sleep & when i woke up, it was really bad. The cramps were so awful. I could barely move & i couldnt take anymore medicine to kind of silence the cramps. All i could do was lie there with a heating pad, in pain. At about 3:00 i took another ibprofen & i was able to sleep. Now its morning & i feel pretty good. The cramps were pretty bad but i got through them. Insertion was not anywhere near as bad as i thought it was gonna be from reading these post, my insertion was quite painless & i dont have ANY KIDS. It all depends on your body. Dont believe that what happened to other people will happen to you, because they arent you!

2014-12-17 14:31:06 UTC

Queen Manni

I just got my mirena yesterday. As a result too reading all these reviews, i was shaking like crazy when i went in there. So before i went, i took 600 mg of ibprofen, 50 mg of tramadol & 10 mg of baclofen. I was pretty scared & i didnt want to feel anything. (mind you guys, i dont have any kids & im 18) When i got there the nurse also gave me 800mg of ibprofen. So i had taken a lot of medicine. My gyn understood & said i was okay, i just shouldnt take any more ibprofen for the rest of the day. Anyways to the point. Took off the pants, got on the table & covered myelf with a sheet. The nurse was really nice & she let me squeze her hand & kept my mind off of it. So basically the gyn went in there, put in a speculum, cleaned around a bit & gave me a local anesthetic to numb the area. After she gave me the shot, i thought i was going deaf. But i was so busy talking to the nurse, i barely felt any type of pain with insertion. The gyn said that it normall takes 7 minutes, but mines took 20 because my cervix is shaped weird. But i was shocked by how well i felt. The nurse took my blood pressure every 5 minutes & then they told me i was good to go. I was really sleepy so i slept the whole way home & when i got home i went to sleep & when i woke up, it was really bad. The cramps were so awful. I could barely move & i couldnt take anymore medicine to kind of silence the cramps. All i could do was lie there with a heating pad, in pain. At about 3:00 i took another ibprofen & i was able to sleep. Now its morning & i feel pretty good. The cramps were pretty bad but i got through them. Insertion was not anywhere near as bad as i thought it was gonna be from reading these post, my insertion was quite painless & i dont have ANY KIDS. It all depends on your body. Dont believe that what happened to other people will happen to you, because they arent you!

2014-12-17 14:31:06 UTC

Queen Manni

I just got my mirena yesterday. As a result too reading all these reviews, i was shaking like crazy when i went in there. So before i went, i took 600 mg of ibprofen, 50 mg of tramadol & 10 mg of baclofen. I was pretty scared & i didnt want to feel anything. (mind you guys, i dont have any kids & im 18) When i got there the nurse also gave me 800mg of ibprofen. So i had taken a lot of medicine. My gyn understood & said i was okay, i just shouldnt take any more ibprofen for the rest of the day. Anyways to the point. Took off the pants, got on the table & covered myelf with a sheet. The nurse was really nice & she let me squeze her hand & kept my mind off of it. So basically the gyn went in there, put in a speculum, cleaned around a bit & gave me a local anesthetic to numb the area. After she gave me the shot, i thought i was going deaf. But i was so busy talking to the nurse, i barely felt any type of pain with insertion. The gyn said that it normall takes 7 minutes, but mines took 20 because my cervix is shaped weird. But i was shocked by how well i felt. The nurse took my blood pressure every 5 minutes & then they told me i was good to go. I was really sleepy so i slept the whole way home & when i got home i went to sleep & when i woke up, it was really bad. The cramps were so awful. I could barely move & i couldnt take anymore medicine to kind of silence the cramps. All i could do was lie there with a heating pad, in pain. At about 3:00 i took another ibprofen & i was able to sleep. Now its morning & i feel pretty good. The cramps were pretty bad but i got through them. Insertion was not anywhere near as bad as i thought it was gonna be from reading these post, my insertion was quite painless & i dont have ANY KIDS. It all depends on your body. Dont believe that what happened to other people will happen to you, because they arent you!

2014-12-17 14:31:06 UTC

Queen Manni

I just got my mirena yesterday. As a result too reading all these reviews, i was shaking like crazy when i went in there. So before i went, i took 600 mg of ibprofen, 50 mg of tramadol & 10 mg of baclofen. I was pretty scared & i didnt want to feel anything. (mind you guys, i dont have any kids & im 18) When i got there the nurse also gave me 800mg of ibprofen. So i had taken a lot of medicine. My gyn understood & said i was okay, i just shouldnt take any more ibprofen for the rest of the day. Anyways to the point. Took off the pants, got on the table & covered myelf with a sheet. The nurse was really nice & she let me squeze her hand & kept my mind off of it. So basically the gyn went in there, put in a speculum, cleaned around a bit & gave me a local anesthetic to numb the area. After she gave me the shot, i thought i was going deaf. But i was so busy talking to the nurse, i barely felt any type of pain with insertion. The gyn said that it normall takes 7 minutes, but mines took 20 because my cervix is shaped weird. But i was shocked by how well i felt. The nurse took my blood pressure every 5 minutes & then they told me i was good to go. I was really sleepy so i slept the whole way home & when i got home i went to sleep & when i woke up, it was really bad. The cramps were so awful. I could barely move & i couldnt take anymore medicine to kind of silence the cramps. All i could do was lie there with a heating pad, in pain. At about 3:00 i took another ibprofen & i was able to sleep. Now its morning & i feel pretty good. The cramps were pretty bad but i got through them. Insertion was not anywhere near as bad as i thought it was gonna be from reading these post, my insertion was quite painless & i dont have ANY KIDS. It all depends on your body. Dont believe that what happened to other people will happen to you, because they arent you!

2014-12-17 14:31:06 UTC

Queen Manni

I just got my mirena yesterday. As a result too reading all these reviews, i was shaking like crazy when i went in there. So before i went, i took 600 mg of ibprofen, 50 mg of tramadol & 10 mg of baclofen. I was pretty scared & i didnt want to feel anything. (mind you guys, i dont have any kids & im 18) When i got there the nurse also gave me 800mg of ibprofen. So i had taken a lot of medicine. My gyn understood & said i was okay, i just shouldnt take any more ibprofen for the rest of the day. Anyways to the point. Took off the pants, got on the table & covered myelf with a sheet. The nurse was really nice & she let me squeze her hand & kept my mind off of it. So basically the gyn went in there, put in a speculum, cleaned around a bit & gave me a local anesthetic to numb the area. After she gave me the shot, i thought i was going deaf. But i was so busy talking to the nurse, i barely felt any type of pain with insertion. The gyn said that it normall takes 7 minutes, but mines took 20 because my cervix is shaped weird. But i was shocked by how well i felt. The nurse took my blood pressure every 5 minutes & then they told me i was good to go. I was really sleepy so i slept the whole way home & when i got home i went to sleep & when i woke up, it was really bad. The cramps were so awful. I could barely move & i couldnt take anymore medicine to kind of silence the cramps. All i could do was lie there with a heating pad, in pain. At about 3:00 i took another ibprofen & i was able to sleep. Now its morning & i feel pretty good. The cramps were pretty bad but i got through them. Insertion was not anywhere near as bad as i thought it was gonna be from reading these post, my insertion was quite painless & i dont have ANY KIDS. It all depends on your body. Dont believe that what happened to other people will happen to you, because they arent you!

2014-12-17 14:31:06 UTC

Queen Manni

I just got my mirena yesterday. As a result too reading all these reviews, i was shaking like crazy when i went in there. So before i went, i took 600 mg of ibprofen, 50 mg of tramadol & 10 mg of baclofen. I was pretty scared & i didnt want to feel anything. (mind you guys, i dont have any kids & im 18) When i got there the nurse also gave me 800mg of ibprofen. So i had taken a lot of medicine. My gyn understood & said i was okay, i just shouldnt take any more ibprofen for the rest of the day. Anyways to the point. Took off the pants, got on the table & covered myelf with a sheet. The nurse was really nice & she let me squeze her hand & kept my mind off of it. So basically the gyn went in there, put in a speculum, cleaned around a bit & gave me a local anesthetic to numb the area. After she gave me the shot, i thought i was going deaf. But i was so busy talking to the nurse, i barely felt any type of pain with insertion. The gyn said that it normall takes 7 minutes, but mines took 20 because my cervix is shaped weird. But i was shocked by how well i felt. The nurse took my blood pressure every 5 minutes & then they told me i was good to go. I was really sleepy so i slept the whole way home & when i got home i went to sleep & when i woke up, it was really bad. The cramps were so awful. I could barely move & i couldnt take anymore medicine to kind of silence the cramps. All i could do was lie there with a heating pad, in pain. At about 3:00 i took another ibprofen & i was able to sleep. Now its morning & i feel pretty good. The cramps were pretty bad but i got through them. Insertion was not anywhere near as bad as i thought it was gonna be from reading these post, my insertion was quite painless & i dont have ANY KIDS. It all depends on your body. Dont believe that what happened to other people will happen to you, because they arent you!

2014-12-17 14:31:06 UTC

Queen Manni

I just got my mirena yesterday. As a result too reading all these reviews, i was shaking like crazy when i went in there. So before i went, i took 600 mg of ibprofen, 50 mg of tramadol & 10 mg of baclofen. I was pretty scared & i didnt want to feel anything. (mind you guys, i dont have any kids & im 18) When i got there the nurse also gave me 800mg of ibprofen. So i had taken a lot of medicine. My gyn understood & said i was okay, i just shouldnt take any more ibprofen for the rest of the day. Anyways to the point. Took off the pants, got on the table & covered myelf with a sheet. The nurse was really nice & she let me squeze her hand & kept my mind off of it. So basically the gyn went in there, put in a speculum, cleaned around a bit & gave me a local anesthetic to numb the area. After she gave me the shot, i thought i was going deaf. But i was so busy talking to the nurse, i barely felt any type of pain with insertion. The gyn said that it normall takes 7 minutes, but mines took 20 because my cervix is shaped weird. But i was shocked by how well i felt. The nurse took my blood pressure every 5 minutes & then they told me i was good to go. I was really sleepy so i slept the whole way home & when i got home i went to sleep & when i woke up, it was really bad. The cramps were so awful. I could barely move & i couldnt take anymore medicine to kind of silence the cramps. All i could do was lie there with a heating pad, in pain. At about 3:00 i took another ibprofen & i was able to sleep. Now its morning & i feel pretty good. The cramps were pretty bad but i got through them. Insertion was not anywhere near as bad as i thought it was gonna be from reading these post, my insertion was quite painless & i dont have ANY KIDS. It all depends on your body. Dont believe that what happened to other people will happen to you, because they arent you!

2014-12-17 14:31:06 UTC

Queen Manni

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